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Does allowing users to test VALUEs increase the likelihood that SECRET will be broken or illegal hashed values generated, relative to the CONTROL scenario? By definition a cryptographic Message Authentication Code such as HMAC is secure only if resists existential forgery under chosen-plaintext attacks. i.e. if allowing users to test VALUEs increases ...


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Would you use HMAC-SHA1 or HMAC-SHA256 for message authentication? Yes. That is a semi-serious answer; both are very good choices, assuming, of course, that a Message Authentication Code is the appropriate solution (that is, both sides share a secret key), and you don't need extreme speed. How much HMAC-SHA256 is slower than HMAC-SHA1? Those ...


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Honestly, in practice, there are very few if any reasons to use SHA-224. As fgrieu notes, SHA-224 is simply SHA-256 with a different IV and with 32 of the output bits thrown away. For most purposes, if you want a hash with more than 128 but less than 256 bits, simply using SHA-256 and truncating the output yourself to the desired bit length is simpler and ...


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SHA-224, part of FIPS 180 since FIPS 180-3 FIPS 180-2 change notice 1 of 2004, was introduced to match the second of the security strengths {80, 112, 128, 192, 256} defined in the document that became NIST Special Publication 800-57 – Recommendation for Key Management – Part 1: General (Revision 3). That security strength itself was kept ...


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It meets the security requirement for 112-bit collision and preimage resistance, while being 32 bits shorter than SHA-256. This may not seem like a lot, but when you have thousands or even millions of hashes or signatures to worry about in a system, those extra 4 bytes add up. Think of a webmail service, where a hash of each email is used for deduplication ...



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