Tag Info

New answers tagged

10

This is trivially true via the pigeonhole principle. SHA-2/512 has $2^{512}$ possible outputs, but $2^{2^{128}} - 1$ possible inputs. Trying $2^{512}+1$ unique inputs is sufficient to produce at least one collision. That said, SHA-2/512 is designed to be collision resistant, which implies that it should be hard to find two inputs that hash to the same ...


2

No, that's not possible, as you calculate sha512(F2) without the state of sha512(F1). What you require is compress(mix(compress(mix(IH, F1)), F2)) while what you have is compress(mix(IH, F1)) and compress(mix(IH, F2)). So you would have to undo that last compression, which is obviously not possible. Here IH is the initial state (the values of $h_1$ etc.) ...


5

Most standard-use iterative hash functions (including SHA-512) are build in a way that these types of operation are not possible (without breaking the hash function). They work generally in this way: The message is split in same-size blocks (usually with some padding at the end to fill the last block): $pad(M) = M_0 || M_1 || M_2 ... || M_n$. There is ...


0

I managed to find it out by reproducing the test vectors. TL;DR: The standard assumes that you use the low 4 bits of the last byte of the hash, regardless of its length. So replace 19 in the original DT definition with 31 for SHA-256 or 63 for SHA-512 and you are good to go. Finding this out wasn't completely straightforward, as the standard only has a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included