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An attack is described in Section 4.1.6 of the SEC1 document. Regarding xagawa's answer: The attack you describe is different from that described in Section 4.5 of the Blake-Wilson--Menezes paper. Specifically, their attack: (a) does not require knowledge of the secret ephemeral key $k$, and (b) changes the reference point $P$, which is not allowed in ...


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If we signed a secret message $m$ by publishing its signature $σ$ computed as $m^d\bmod N$, at least two very bad things would happen: The message would not be so secret anymore That's because anyone knows the public key $(N,e)$, and thus from $σ$ can compute $σ^e\bmod N$, which is $m\bmod N$. This reveals a lot of information about $m$, which goes ...


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There is no separate "digital signature exchange." A certificate is a self-contained thing; it contains an "issuer" field (with a DN of the CA that signed it) and a "signature" field (with a signature from that CA). A server does not just send its certificate in the ServerCertificate message; it sends a whole chain of certificates, starting with theirs, then ...



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