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7

Copy / paste that key into http://phpseclib.sourceforge.net/x509/asn1parse.php and you'll see that there are several different integers in there. p is there, q is there as is the exponent and several other integers to speed things up by taking advantage of the Chinese Remainder Theorem. The key is encoded using DER and derives semantic meaning via ASN.1. ...


5

It is correct that the given private key does not encode a single integer, and that it includes two primes $p$ and $q$. More precisely, that Base64 data encodes a string of bytes, which is an RSAPrivateKey encoded per ASN.1 DER-TLV (and thus BER-TLV) following PKCS#1v2 Appendix A.1.2 (likely restricted to version 0). It decodes to: 30 ASN.1 tag for ...


2

RFC 4492 specifies ECC for TLS1.0 and TLS1.1. It does not cover TLS1.2 because it was written before TLS1.2; notice that 4492 is less than 5246. RFC 5246 TLS1.2 changes the signature structure for all signing algorithms including ECDSA, and also adds a Hello extension to negotiate supported signing algorithms (including hash) more flexibly. RFC 5246 A.7 ...


2

Aren't $IV_1$ and $IV_2$ public in TLS 1.2 as well? $IV_1$ certainly is (as that's just the ciphertext block in front of the block we're attacking); however the IV that the TLS 1.2 sender will use for the next message ($IV_2$) is not. In fact, the sender might not know it yet, as it might not have not picked it yet. But doesn't this mean that BEAST ...


1

Well, you have it right in how nonces are used to make sure that the keys in different SSL sessions; this effectively prevents someone from taking an SSL record from one session, and injecting it into another -- because the keys aren't the same, it won't pass the integrity tests. However, that's not the only place we care about replay attacks; we can also ...


1

First, note that $192=3\cdot64$, so the real key length of 3DES is $192$ bits. However, since $8$ bits in each subkey are parity bits, this reduces to $3\cdot56=168$ bits of non-redundant key material. Now, the reason that 3DES' effective key length is usually classified as $2\cdot56=112$ bits is that 3DES is susceptible to a meet-in-the-middle attack: When ...


1

DES has been specified to take a 64 bit key, but only 56 of them are used. The remainder are parity bits. The key ostensibly consists of 64 bits; however, only 56 of these are actually used by the algorithm. Eight bits are used solely for checking parity, and are thereafter discarded. Hence the effective key length is 56 bits For 3DES the nominal key ...


1

What about the beautiful images on this page, Certificate Binary Posters part 1 and part 2? I'd believe they would be useful in this case.


1

To conclude the answers here's a note about the simplest way (on linux at least) to view the contents of such keys with openssl: $ openssl rsa -in test.key -text Private-Key: (512 bit) modulus: 00:83:8b:7a:98:1d:a9:7a:cc:d3:b3:b8:75:5f:e7: 27:98:12:03:5d:a3:72:30:5e:05:72:b9:99:93:bb: 19:ce:fb:f0:7b:af:84:98:be:46:fa:a1:4a:2f:36: ...



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