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-5

We know, from Edward Snowden, that the NSA does, routinely monitor all traffic and can decrypt all standard encryption, such as SSL. So it is likely that they have methods to break AES. So, if you are concerned about industrial espionage, AES is unlikely to be your algorithm of choice - this is not just because of NSA or GCHQ spying, any third party ...


2

TLS 1.0 is in effect SSL 3.1. If you need more details about the history and why it is called TLS 1.0 instead of SSL 3.1 read Wikipedia.


1

It depends! Any of the two alternatives TLS or directly symmetric encryption with a pre-shared key will of course require the sender (him/herself) to encrypt the data. From a cryptographic perspective any statement about security/"being secure" even relative often requires specifity and not much about the actual ciphers are stated. that is why the answer ...


1

Ensuring that you're talking to the correct server is the client's duty. They need to verify the certificate and reject anonymous DH. A client that accepts anon DH or doesn't verify the server's certificate is always vulnerable to MitM, even if the server disables anon DH. Thus disabling anonymous DH on the server has little effect on security, beyond ...


1

If there are absolutely no clients that implement DH_anon (or ECDH_anon), then an attacker cannot exploit those cipher suites. When setting up your server, how do you know that there are none? How do you know someone won't plant a backdoor in a client somewhere to force those cipher suites? Better to be safe than sorry and risk your users' private data.


3

So that the server knows who you are. After all, TLS protects the communication; however anyone can initiate a TLS connection to the server (unless the server insists that client authentication must be used; they rarely do). So, if the server needs to make any decision based on who the client is, it needs to find that out itself; TLS usually won't provide ...


2

I need a small clarification that why openssl using SHA1 in ECC when I am using secp384r1 curve, but in rfc they are saying we should use SHA2. OpenSSL uses SHA-1 because RFC 4492 defines the use of ECC on SSL with SHA-1. It should also support SHA-384 as defined in RFC 5289. Which hash algorithm is used in TLS depends on the cipher suite. For example: ...


0

I would only add that use-case is important to know as to whether a Certificate Authority (CA) is needed. If you are using CPanel for your own website and don't want to pay for an SSL cert, you can create a self-signed certificate, and then tell your browser to trust that public key. You are then acting as your own CA, essentially. Another case might be an ...


3

The certificate makes sure that whoever you're talking to is who they claim they are. With TLS/SSL without certs you wouldn't notice if you're communicating with an impostor over an encrypted channel instead of whoever you're expecting to communicate with. This leads to so called man-in-the-middle attacks. You really should read this, if you're going to use ...



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