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5

Please bear in mind that this information is all secondhand. I have not looked closely at the original drafts of Hash DRBG (although you might find a draft that's early enough if you peruse the FOIA results in [1]). However, during conversations with folks at NIST I was told that there were certain weaknesses in early drafts of Hash DRBG that were very ...


5

The real question isn't "Why doesn't Suite B use P-521?" It is, "Why doesn't Suite B use AES-192?" NSA were only interested in 192-bit security for Suite B, but they chose to use AES-256 because AES-192 wasn't widely supported. "In fact we had wanted to use AES -128 and AES-192, but a quick survey of AES implementations (hardware centric, I believe) ...


5

Under the assumption that $(K,\text{Msg})\to H_K(\text{Msg})$ is a secure MAC (be it HMAC or any other MAC), and $\text{Nonce}$ does not repeat and is of fixed size, both $H_K(\text{Msg}||\text{Nonce})$ and $H_K(\text{Nonce}||\text{Msg})$ are demonstrably secure, in the sense that an adversary not knowing $K$ can't distinguish either from random, even for ...


3

Yes. $\:$ "simply XORing" is obviously malleable, which may allow related-key attacks. "When storing a short key, e.g. a 256-bit ECC private key," the "good reason to use AES" is that "the XOR with a single PBKDF2 (or other KDF) output block" is not necessarily sufficient, since an adversary might also have changed the stored public key.


3

Your description of how RFC 5959 works isn't quite right. It is not quite correct to state that RFC 5959 encrypts using AES in ECB mode. A correct statement is: if the plaintext is exactly 128 bits, then use ECB mode, otherwise use a non-trivial mode of operation found in RFC 3394. In the former case, ECB mode is fine, since it's just a single block of ...


2

RFC 2313 specifies the RSAPrivateKey ASN1 structure as a SEQUENCE containing the INTEGERs $0$; $n$; $e$; $d$; $p$; $q$; $d\bmod(p-1)$; $d\bmod(q-1)$; $q^{-1}\bmod p$. The PEM format consists of such a structure encoded as Base64 and framed by the typical BEGIN/END RSA PRIVATE KEY header and footer lines. Thus, you can use any ASN1 library you like to ...


1

The multiplier parameter $k$ is different between SRP 6 and 6a. You can see that RFC 5054 calculates it using a hash of the domain parameters (modulus $N$ and generator $g$), so it is using SRP 6a, as opposed to SRP 6 where $k$ is constant. Likewise, in section 6.2.1 of IEC 11770-4 – the October 2005 draft at least – the equivalent value $c$ is defined as a ...


1

All the security definitions I am aware of for a cryptographic hash functions remain the same, if you apply a 1:1 mapping before hashing. In other words, if $f$ and $g$ are each others inverse, and $h$ is a secure cryptographic hash, then $x \to h(f(x))$ is also a secure cryptographic hash according to any security definition, I know of. Under such ...



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