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2

If this can code can help you understanding the Linear Shift Register. (^ represents Exclusive OR) byte[] register = new byte[] { 0, 1, 0, 1 }; byte[] plain = new byte[] { 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1 }; ; byte[] cipher = new byte[plain.Length]; for (int i = 0; i < plain.Length; i++) { //plaintext ^ ...


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Read the drawing assuming: each of the four (about) square boxes $a_j$ initially (at $t=0$) holds one of the four bits of $S_0$ (in reading order, unless otherwise stated); information follows arrows (almost) instantly, except when getting into a square box where that is delayed until $t$ has grown by $1$ (in time unit or clock period); notice this ...


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Thomas Pornin's last paragraph is right on, but this concept is still so frequently misunderstood that I wanted to add my 2 cents. From a layman's perspective, If you really had something that implemented a one-time-pad, what would it look like? It would necessarily have to involve a physical machine that generates a truly random key stream. That machine ...


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You won't be able to use a stream cipher with VOIP, because packet loss will prevent you from properly decrypting data that follows the missing chunks. It may be possible to work around this issue, if you can figure out the size of the missing data, and assuming your chosen stream cipher does not have feedback, fast-forward to cipher to the start of the ...



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