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a) The question seems to be about a comparison of the size of the key spaces. The hint already shows the key spaces for Vigenère with a 10-letter key ($26^{10}$) and for simple substitution ($26!$). Simple substitution has the much bigger key space. b) Using frequency analysis simple substitution is much easier to solve. Basic frequency analysis does not ...


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This is called homophonic encryption, and has been around for a long time. In terms of cryptanalysis of such ciphers, there is a nice thesis from SJSU on this topic which is available here. The attacks tested in that cipher were based on hill climbing and local optimization techniques. The conclusion states: We designed and implemented an efficient ...


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In a Feistel networks (from the German IBM cryptographer Horst Feistel), the input is divided into two blocks ($L_0$ and $R_0$) which interact with each other. Main example is DES. basic construction: In a SPN (Substitution Permutation Network), the input is divided into multiple small blocks, applied to a S-box (substitution), then the bits positions ...


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I don't have enough space to expand on yyyyyyy's answer in a comment so I am making this an answer in and of itself. TruthSerum is correct, but it seems like an explanation is wanted, so here goes. Imagine you have a regular (all the sides have the same length, all the angles are the same) n-gon. That sounds complex, but trust me it isn't. A 4-gon is ...



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