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I don't know what you mean by "full security", but "adaptive" just means that the oracle queries from the attacker depend on the results of previous queries. In contrast, "non adaptive" means that the attacker simply makes all the queries in batch, that is, without adapting his queries from previous results. Update: based on the paper from your comments, it ...


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Your example is missing something: your two calls to the OpenSSL library are entirely entirely independent, but your calls to the mcrypt library reuse an existing handle. CBC has the property that identical plaintext blocks are exceedingly unlikely to encrypt to the same value due to chaining of the previous output into the next input. Your OpenSSL calls ...


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it's called homomorphic cryptography. A fully homomorphic cryptosystem allows E(a) +/* E(b) = E(a +/* b). This implies operations on encrypted data, which is a nice thing to have, an example is storing E(a) and E(b) on the server and you can query the server for E(a+b) without exposing plaintext a and b. This is an active research area since first practical ...


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In addition to yyyyyyy's answer, there is also probabilistic encryption, in which the encryption process incorporates some randomness. That allows many identical messages with the same key to be encrypted differently; it doesn't necessarily encrypt the same text differently in the same message (it might encrypt $a+a$ as $E(a)+E(a)$), but it does let you send ...


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I don't think there is a dedicated name for this. If I had to find a word, it would probably be "stateful" or "with explicit state". What you observe is actually the usual case: The user initializes an encryption system with a key, resulting in some state of the system. Then, each time the user wishes to encrypt some data, he has to pass the current state ...



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