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8

Well, it depends on the which protocol is being used. For WEP and WPA, the keys used are derived directly from the pre-shared keys; that means that as long as you know the pre-shared keys, you can immediately decrypt packets as well. On the other hand, WPA2 is somewhat stronger; the two sides exchange nonces to derive the keys. Hence, unless you listen ...


7

Curiously, the answer is »Yes« to both questions. Each client (STA) establishes a different pairwise transient key (PTK) with the access point (AP) for each session, but this PTK is derived from the pairwise master key (PMK). And if you are using a pre-shared key (PSK, usually derived from a password entered by the users), this PSK is used as the PMK. The ...


5

This approach is likely not novel, but just an application of covert channel. This is example of paper about detecting UDP packet length steganography. Because there has been already packet length used for messaging so often that even its detection has been discussed in papers, this cannot be very novel. However, often the use of such side-channel is used ...


2

As Thomas pointed out in his comment, in WPA-PSK the parties already have a shared secret (the pre-shared key), so there is no need to go through the step of Diffie-Hellman key-exchange, which is a way for parties to agree on a shared key when they don't have any secrets in common to begin with. In WPA, the client and the access point goes through a step ...


1

Specifically to answer your question of whether or no using the packet size in a wireless network is novel, the answer is no. See http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/projects/poirot3/Oakland/sp/PAPERS/2008/3168A311.PDF Specifically in Section 4: The exploit field chosen for the experiment is the 16- bit packet size field of a link layer protocol ...


1

It's the same reason why open WIFI isn't encrypted. It is feasible and we have the technology and means, but the problem lies in our inefficient nature as humans. It makes perfect sense to use Diffie-Hellman/RSA, yet someone up there decided to standardize it in a non optimal way. The world is inefficient and standards move slower than mountains, numerous ...



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