1,180 reputation
619
bio website ethanheilman.tumblr.com
location Cambridge, MA
age 31
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Mar 27 at 13:47

Mar
27
revised Besides key and ciphertext sizes what are other advantages of elliptic curve versions of various protocols?
added 1 characters in body
Feb
27
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
4
revised How long would the 100 Year Cryptography Project have secured its data had it been started 100 years ago?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
2
comment Why programming languages don't provide simple encryption methods?
You have a source for the statement that "it turns out that the AES has a back door that the NSA has access to"?
Sep
30
comment Could one construct a cipher that is secure for friendly parties to use but insecure for hostile parties?
@user4982 The Soviets did the same thing with GOST (different s-boxes to different people, some believed to be backdoored). 4C Entity thinks like the USSR?
Sep
29
awarded  Cleanup
Sep
29
revised Could one construct a cipher that is secure for friendly parties to use but insecure for hostile parties?
rolled back to a previous revision
Sep
7
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is the “secure-as-worst-case” version of NTRU patented?
Sep
7
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Encryption/ciphers/codes in Chinese
Sep
7
awarded  Custodian
Sep
7
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Encryption/ciphers/codes in Chinese
Jul
22
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
16
accepted Designing a key expander out of ciphers
Jul
12
awarded  Yearling
Apr
11
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
awarded  Announcer
Feb
20
comment Why programming languages don't provide simple encryption methods?
I am asking for serious failures in security that results in physical or financial damage. Such examples would make the case for simple easy to use packaged encryption in much the same way that firms which did not salt their passwords and had massive password exposures helped the security community "raise the bar" on password hashing standards.
Jan
7
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
23
comment Because the algorithm is known, it is no longer a trade secret
The NSA has several secret ciphers, called SUITE A (BATON being one of the most well known). SUITE A ciphers (not publicly revealed) are considered the most secure by the NSA (although a few type 1 ciphers are public). That is not to say the ciphers have not be subject to review, many many cryptographers work for the NSA and have attempted to break these ciphers. That being said, I'd still prefer AES256 to BATON if my life depended on it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BATON archives.neohapsis.com/archives/crypto/2000-q4/0028.html en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_Suite_A_Cryptography
Oct
16
accepted What is the general justification for the hardness of finding preimages for cryptographic hash functions?