178 reputation
8
bio website kanjibox.net
location Kyoto
age 94
visits member for 10 months
seen Sep 18 at 11:00

Bioinformatics, Machine-learning and (a very little bit of) Crypto.


Sep
9
revised Privacy-Preserving Protocols and Proofs of Security
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Sep
9
comment Privacy-Preserving Protocols and Proofs of Security
Sorry, I should have written out all the constraints, but generally, if you do obfuscation, you want to avoid the field limit, so you would add $r ∈ [0, n-x[$ (for example II). That is definitely not uniformly distributed. Not sure what you mean otherwise: Homomorphic scheme allow scalar multiplication and many obfuscation schemes might require more than simple addition.
Sep
9
comment Privacy-Preserving Protocols and Proofs of Security
This is mainly what I was told when discussing such protocols with people in the field. This is also the general impression I get from literature (where the typical "proof of security" for obfuscation is that the obfuscated value is uniformly distributed). I realise this is a weak source and it sounds like a lazy upper bound to me, which is precisely why I'd love some hard reference to what defines proper obfuscation security in such a context.
Sep
9
revised Privacy-Preserving Protocols and Proofs of Security
added 368 characters in body
Sep
9
asked Privacy-Preserving Protocols and Proofs of Security
Dec
18
awarded  Supporter
Dec
18
accepted Logical OR operation in a homomorphic additive cryptosystem
Dec
18
comment Logical OR operation in a homomorphic additive cryptosystem
Indeed, you're right. Completely forgot about NAND. That would indeed negate the non-FHE condition. At least now I know there's no point searching!
Dec
17
asked Logical OR operation in a homomorphic additive cryptosystem
Nov
17
awarded  Scholar
Nov
17
accepted Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
Nov
16
revised Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
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Nov
16
comment Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
No: thanks for your patience. Secure computing is far from my specialty and I'm learning as I go (that being said, it's interesting that the first paper I went with, a refereed published paper, had a much different version of what seems to be the right conditions)...
Nov
16
awarded  Teacher
Nov
16
revised Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
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Nov
16
awarded  Commentator
Nov
16
revised Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
added 596 characters in body
Nov
16
revised Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
added 41 characters in body
Nov
16
revised Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
added 456 characters in body
Nov
16
comment Homomorphic (encrypted) comparison to an integer
let us continue this discussion in chat