830 reputation
426
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United Kingdom
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 1 hour ago

Pentester, ex-developer, security researcher, reverse engineer, electronics tinkerer, internet activist, zombie eradicator, promulgator of useless facts, shrubbery inspector, bacon aficionado.

Strengths: Security, Crypto, Win32 API, C#, .NET, PHP, x86 assembly

All answers and comments are encrypted with ROT256-ECB.

Opinions are my own. Advice provided with no warranty.


Nov
28
accepted Blum Blum Shub vs. AES-CTR or other CSPRNGs
Nov
28
asked What cipher mode is suitable for independantly decryptable short messages?
Nov
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
6
comment Attack by replaying messages
Assuming, of course, both parties have a way of accurately measuring the time and compensating for geographical differences, daylight savings, leap-seconds, etc.
Nov
6
awarded  Critic
Oct
26
comment Is this a secure implementation of password reset email?
@JeremyW.Sherman The salt is allowed to be public. It's only there to prevent cross-user precomputation attacks such as rainbow tables.
Oct
16
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
12
accepted In layman's terms, how does Shor's algorithm work?
Oct
10
comment How is it possible to parallelize a hashing function to crack an iteratively hashed password?
An important point to make is that a GPU is essentially a large parallel arithmetic unit. Think of it as a 256-core (or more) CPU with little/no ability to do branching (if/then/else), but a particularly strong ability to perform scalar calculations. Most hash functions can be expressed almost entirely as a series of scalar calculations, which means that it's possible to use a GPU to perform lots of them at once.
Oct
10
comment Avalanche noise RNG for one-time pad use
Avalanche noise isn't particularly invulnerable to external EM, either. With a decent antenna and some maths you can skew the generator, or at least disrupt the quality of the random source. If you're looking at NESSIE spec security or similar, an attacker with physical proximity to the device should most definitely be considered a potential threat.
Oct
10
comment In layman's terms, how does Shor's algorithm work?
That's actually a really great way of explaining it.
Oct
6
comment In layman's terms, how does Shor's algorithm work?
@RickyDemer Maybe, but isn't the whole scary part that it can factor semiprimes in polynomial time, thus rendering a good portion of our current asymmetric ciphers broken?
Oct
3
comment Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?
@ThomasPornin Good point. I'll switch to 1024 for now, and I'll find a WinXP box to test 2048-bit on.
Oct
3
comment Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?
@ThomasPornin Interesting. I read on MSDN that the base CSP was 512-bits and shipped with the OS, and it implied (or, rather, I inferred) that you have to manually download the expanded CSP. Am I wrong in this assumption?
Oct
2
accepted Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?
Oct
2
comment Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?
@Thomas Yikes. I'll see if I can find a pure-managed implementation of RSA then, so I can use 2048-bit keys.
Oct
2
comment Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?
Is there a decent projection of the time it'd take to break a 512-bit key today?
Oct
2
asked In layman's terms, how does Shor's algorithm work?
Oct
2
asked Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?
Sep
14
comment Why RSA can't handle numbers above 76?
Interesting question. I'm guessing the answer is something to do with the number of bits you can encrypt with such low p and q (or e and d in your case) values, but I'm unsure as to how the modulus affects this. This question would be better on Crypto SE though, so I've flagged for a moderator to move it.