5,884 reputation
2836
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location Netherlands
age 40
visits member for 3 years
seen 2 days ago

Security professional with many years of experience with the practical application of cryptographic algorithms and protocols. I'm helping with the design of protocols and API's within international standardization bodies. Lead developer of a common criteria certified product. Over 30 years of general experience with computers.

Currently looking for a new position in the Netherlands.


Dec
22
comment Why shouldn't I use ECB encryption?
Hmm, first guess probably right: github.com/h3xstream/find-sec-bugs/blob/master/plugin/src/main/…
Dec
22
comment Why shouldn't I use ECB encryption?
@Rogue It requires Java 8 or an installed Bouncy Castle provider. Known as "AES/GCM/NoPadding".
Dec
22
comment Why shouldn't I use ECB encryption?
Interesting, what software generated that particular warning? FindBugs, PMD?
Dec
21
comment OpenSSL des-ede3 not producing same output as test vector implies it should be
Now that's just funny, finding a typo in one of the DES test vectors, and an evil one at that 666 indeed :)
Dec
16
awarded  Tumbleweed
Dec
13
comment Bae64 with shuffled alphabet
You know far more than that. For instance XML is text, so expect printable characters. There will be a lot of greater than and less than signs but also the equals operator and quotes are likely abundant because of tag attributes. And then there is the whitespace as well - lots of spaces and/or tab characters and possibly end of lines (using the double \r\n used for Windows, so if they are present you have two characters in a row!). Of course the bits are distributed over the 3 bytes encoded as 4 characters, but that could be advantageous as well.
Dec
9
revised CAST-256 (CAST6) versions or S-Boxes
added 121 characters in body
Dec
9
revised CAST-256 (CAST6) versions or S-Boxes
added 127 characters in body
Dec
9
revised CAST-256 (CAST6) versions or S-Boxes
added 133 characters in body
Dec
9
asked CAST-256 (CAST6) versions or S-Boxes
Dec
9
comment MD-compliant hashes don't really accept arbitary length input, do they?
I think it won't scale that high on the list of MD5 deficiencies if it's not MD-compliant with regards to this. It would be fun though if you could generate a collision after 2^64 cycles, some kind of MD5 "time bomb" :)
Dec
9
awarded  Mortarboard
Dec
7
comment suitable programming language for cryptography algorithms
That would have been the swap file or partition.
Dec
6
answered Memory-expensive hash from an array of hashes?
Dec
6
comment SHA1 Collisions - what about practical attacks?
Yeah, IAIK did try a distributed collision finding approach some time ago, and I even spend some CPU cycles on it, but it didn't lead to a collision in the end. SHA-1 is fiercely resisting deprecation, although it is losing out in the end :)
Dec
6
comment Is any group of bits in a SHA-1 hash more/less unique than another?
@mikeazo I guess that kind of remark could be an important part of an answer. But for anybody not directly into attacks on SHA - such as me - it certainly does not answer the question.
Dec
6
comment Is any group of bits in a SHA-1 hash more/less unique than another?
@mikeazo Eh, how do you recon that this is a dupe of that? Are you pointing to the right question?
Dec
6
revised SHA1 Collisions - what about practical attacks?
added 36 characters in body
Dec
6
comment SHA1 Collisions - what about practical attacks?
I've created an answer that basically says: see MD5. In what sense are these the same attacks against MD5? Are there differences?
Dec
6
answered SHA1 Collisions - what about practical attacks?