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Mar
17
comment Reusing a one-time pad?
Bad idea. Triple DES is usually slower than AES, and if you go for a hardware implementation, you might as well make it AES too.
Mar
17
comment Reusing a one-time pad?
The Cortex looks pretty fast for AES, but I don't know the requirements. @cpast I'm pretty sure OCB beats GCM (and I certainly hope that this is not a defensive device). GCM may not be fast on embedded, but as the Cortex is 32 bit the performance could be better than the 8/16 bit counterparts.
Mar
17
comment I was wondering if RSA is an homomorphic crypto system?
@mikeazo Agreed, although I had to take an extra look at it to find the RSA part. It seems mainly to be in the title - and fortunately the answer with the most upvotes.
Mar
17
comment Is truncating a SHA512 hash to the first 160 bits as secure as using SHA1?
Note that the ad-hoc standard for using truncated hashes is to use the leftmost bytes as the hash value (removing bytes from the right). Please use this as default. With regards to security it doesn't matter which bits are used, but it could make a difference with regards to compatibility.
Mar
17
comment Practical strength of non-2^n RSA key lengths
Closed it, but for more information, see how the RSA factoring challenge doesn't keep to powers of two at all. So answer is "no".
Mar
17
comment Differential Fault Analysis of AES
Ah, wow, wecome to Crypto, Miss Seeluna :)
Mar
17
answered Why not send the identity in the encrypted message?
Mar
17
awarded  Announcer
Mar
16
comment Differential Fault Analysis of AES
A short description of the technique used should be part of the answer, so if you can add it we would be grateful.
Mar
16
revised What is the most light-weight symmetric cipher thats still usefull?
edited tags
Mar
16
comment What is the most light-weight symmetric cipher thats still usefull?
And the requirements for the crypto of course.
Mar
16
comment Can the same random number be used in encryption and signing?
@zof Is there still anything missing from the answer? If you want an answer specific for DSA/ElGamal then please create an explicit question about that...
Mar
15
comment Statistical saturation attack on block ciphers
Could you indicate what you don't understand from the paper you've linked to? Note: just trying to improve the question here.
Mar
13
comment Blowfish ECB mode: Tools for known-plaintext attack?
@VincentAdvocaat The difference here is that this question talks about retrieving the key value (if I read it correctly). The ECB distinguishability is an issue, but it is an issue for the ECB mode of operation, not the block cipher itself.
Mar
12
comment When is a cipher considered broken?
I would say that since these terms are not that well defined that you should always consider context if anybody claims that a cipher is broken or compromised. There may be a strong definition of both terms, but as long as the terms are used loosely by most persons, that would be a moot point.
Mar
12
comment Can the same random number be used in encryption and signing?
Added two reasons I've come across.
Mar
12
revised Can the same random number be used in encryption and signing?
added 28 characters in body
Mar
12
comment Repair AES-128 decrypted file
To all: Is there no check at all with regards to the correctness of the passphrase in OpenSSL? I'm wondering why the decrypt does not fail.
Mar
12
revised Can the same random number be used in encryption and signing?
added 88 characters in body
Mar
11
answered Can the same random number be used in encryption and signing?