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seen Oct 25 at 18:48

Sep
25
awarded  Supporter
Sep
25
accepted SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?
Sep
25
comment SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?
Ahh yea. This morning I woke up thinking about this question and I realized I had the order wrong with TLS/SSL, I was studying IPsec and I had the orders confused between the two. Either way, I think you're answer (@dave_thompson_085) and @otus 's edit clarified things for me. Thanks for your help!
Sep
24
comment SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?
Interesting. Let me make sure I understand. SHA1/MD5 to sign SSL Certificates is not secure because an attacker knows the starting text (is Plaintext still the appropriate term?) that generated a particular digest. Whereas with SSL/TLS (3.0+), since the starting text is encrypted HTTP data, it isn't known and therefore finding a collision against the HMAC Digest in the packet is much, much more difficult? If that is the case, since SSL/TLS does Encryption and then HMAC'ing, isn't the "starting text" simply the cipher text in the application data record, and therefore already known?
Sep
24
comment SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?
To be honest, I don't think I had ever realized. I updated my post to include the correct usage "imminently", rather than immanent. Thanks for the heads up, hobbs.
Sep
24
revised SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?
Fixed grammar, thanks Hobbs!
Sep
23
asked SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?
Apr
3
revised TLS Key Block calculation - What is a PRF?
Edited title to better reflect the right answer to make it easier for others to search for the same content.
Apr
3
awarded  Student
Apr
2
comment TLS Key Block calculation - What is a PRF?
I see. Thanks for the explanation. So a PRF is similar to a Hash, in that it takes input values and produces a "representative" sample of those values, except that a PRF can produce an arbitrary length result. If two people have the same starting data, and use the same hash function within the PRF, and are trying to acquire the same length data, they will always end up with the same final value. (correct me if I'm wrong).
Apr
2
accepted TLS Key Block calculation - What is a PRF?
Apr
2
asked TLS Key Block calculation - What is a PRF?
Apr
1
awarded  Editor
Mar
31
awarded  Scholar
Mar
31
accepted TLS/SSL's usage of Non-Ephemeral DH vs DHE
Mar
31
comment TLS/SSL's usage of Non-Ephemeral DH vs DHE
Brilliant answer, thanks! One quick question. When you answered the first question, you said "...The group might be explicitly specified (as is common in the case of DH) or referenced by an identifier (as is common in the case of ECDH)." For DH, do you mean that the Public Certificate will also include (along with X), the DH Group#, aka, 1, 2, or 5? If so, what did you mean by an "identifier" which is the case of ECDH"
Mar
30
asked TLS/SSL's usage of Non-Ephemeral DH vs DHE