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Oct
6
comment Generating unbiased numbers with a biased six sided die?
If Alice doesn't know the odds then she could also adapt the good old low-tech (but extremely clever) "unfair coin" technique, which might not be optimal but is easy to understand and thus probably more useful in real life with actual dice when two parties are trying to reliably use a biased die to carry out some kind of business. The unfair coin technique: roll twice, then HH -> rethrow, TT -> rethrow, HT -> output 0, TH -> output 1. I'm sure a variant could be devised for six-sided dice.
Oct
3
comment Can machine learning analyze random number generator?
This (probably) won't work. There is certainly structure in CSPRNG's that could potentially be exploited, but I don't believe naive classification will be powerful enough to yield a distinguisher for any nontrivial CSPRNG.
Sep
27
comment RSA: special parameters construction
Isn't $q$ going to be super small (assuming $e$ is small), given the density of the primes?
Sep
20
comment Maximum steganographic embedding rate not detectable by steganalysis?
Are you interested in scenarios when the detector may alter, corrupt, or delete part of the carrier (requiring redundancy and error correction, thus reducing embedding rate) or just the simplest case with a passive detector?
Aug
24
comment Encryption of 8 bit of block data
Does it have to be a block cipher?
Aug
19
comment File encryption with AES CTR mode
Citation needed... if you are reusing nonces in CTR mode you're not doing it right (and ditto if you're using CTR to encrypt hard drives)
Aug
3
comment RSA problem - how to find $d$
There are an incalculable number of threads on this site alone, let alone the whole internet, that address the process of deriving $d$ from $e$. Have you tried searching for them? Hint, there are at least two in the related questions list on the right.
Aug
2
comment Transforming Gaussian random $[0,1] $ numbers to uniform $[0,255] $
@dylan7 A byte is just 8 bits. To get a uniformly distributed byte, take 8 uniformly distributed independent bits and put them together (as in, binary notation).
Jul
31
comment How AES treat string input to encrypt data and what will happen if the cipher key is less than that expected?
If your key has less bytes than expected then it's not really a key, just something that you're trying to pretend is a key.
Jul
25
comment Transforming Gaussian random $[0,1] $ numbers to uniform $[0,255] $
What are the parameters of the gaussian generator? What is the actual distribution of output bytes?
Jul
10
comment One cipher to rule them all?
Threefish, obviously
Jul
9
comment Where can I find names for cryptographic notation I don't recognize?
Furthermore, if the greek letter has not been defined in the surrounding context then it's likely it's not cryptographic notation at all but some quasi-universal notation that the reader is expected to be familiar with (e.g. $\sum$ for sums, $\prod$ indicating a product). You learn these by doing math, and @djsutho's table can help in that case too (also, if you know it's greek, you can en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_alphabet to find the letter's name and google it)
Jul
8
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
7
comment Is one-time-pad still secure if the number of 1's in the key is revealed to the attacker?
Hint: what if you are given that $n = 1$? $n = 2$? How many keys does that rule out, and how many are left? (are they equiprobable?)
Jul
7
comment Diffe-Helman Exchange result is always 1
@Jake Basically, 47 is not a generator modulo 23, but 5 is. It's not called "generator" for nothing, it must have special properties that make it, well, a generator. That's your problem. See Gille's answer below for details
Jun
21
awarded  Caucus
Jun
18
answered is this possible to use asymmetric encryption schemes as order preserving encryption
Jun
12
comment RSA private key d knowing e,n
No need for the quadratic sieve, the prime factors are so close that Fermat's attack actually works.
Jun
11
comment simple algorithm to encrypt/decrypt a text file
@SOJPM I suppose you are trying to keep it simple but I think it's best not to call such constructions OTP's, since they aren't.