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I am an undergraduate computer science and mathematics student in New Zealand. My fields of interest are computer graphics, in particular the physics of light transport, and to some extent cryptography, as well as programming and software development in general.


Feb
2
answered The difference between these 4 breaking Cipher techniques?
Jan
27
comment How cryptographically secure was the original WW2 Enigma machine, from a modern viewpoint?
Does the question also assume that the workings of the Enigma machine (all versions) are made available to the cryptanalyst, in accordance with Kerckhoffs's principle?
Jan
27
comment How long will my encryption remain private?
@Christian The point I am making is the fact that the bitcoin protocol makes it harder and harder to mine blocks up to a point where it is no longer possible is a form of planned obsolescence, because it is quite possible that in the future, finding even a partial preimage of SHA-256 will become easier than brute force and the protocol will be broken (a rather major problem for a currency). I'm not an expert in bitcoin and do not claim to be, and was only replying to the question about bitcoin being about finding collisions.
Jan
27
comment How long will my encryption remain private?
@Christian Yes, I should have said (and was adding) that only the mining part has planned obsolescence. The transaction part of bitcoin is another story.
Jan
27
comment How long will my encryption remain private?
@AJMansfield No, only partial preimages afaik, such as "the first X bits of the hash must match this bitstring", which cannot be done efficiently as far as we know, hence the proof-of-work aspect of it (collisions do not matter for that part of bitcoin I believe). If a fast preimage attack on SHA-256 were discovered, bitcoin would be utterly broken, which is why it (or at least the proof of work part of it) has planned obsolescence in a few years were all blocks will have been mined - hopefully before SHA-256 is broken enough to matter.
Jan
26
awarded  Yearling
Jan
25
comment How can I find the prime numbers used in RSA?
To answer this question you need to understand what the private key given in the problem means (what do the two numbers stand for). Once you do the answer should be relatively simple.
Jan
25
revised How can I find the prime numbers used in RSA?
reformatted using code tags
Jan
23
comment Question about SHA-2 (and potentially similar hashing algorithms)
If the constants were not constant, you could not use the hash function without keying it, so it would not be a hash function but something else. You can read up on en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothing_up_my_sleeve_number
Jan
20
revised Low Public Exponent Attack for RSA
added 238 characters in body
Jan
20
comment Is SHA-256 safe when used in this way?
@StephenTouset Your point is valid, but I think the question here is "assuming TXT cannot be brute-forced, does having multiple hashes of TXT | N help recover it faster".
Jan
19
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Low Public Exponent Attack for RSA
Jan
13
comment Chance in cryptography
Why do you feel that it is a problem? The solution crypto gives to this issue is simply lowering the probability enough (in a measurable and concrete way) to be deemed negligible. Again, just because a probability is not zero doesn't mean it's going to happen.
Jan
12
comment Why is the discrete logarithm problem assumed to be hard?
$O(n)$ is polynomial in the order of the group, in general polynomial-time means polynomial in the number of digits thereof, i.e. $O(\log^k(n))$. This is because we can make $n$ rather large easily (a few hundred digits), but making $\log(n)$ large is "much harder".
Jan
11
comment Cryptographically secure product keys
Have you considered the option of simply storing assigned product keys on the server securely?
Jan
10
reviewed Approve suggested edit on
Jan
10
reviewed Approve suggested edit on
Jan
10
revised ECDSA vs ECIES vs ECDH
proper abbreviations, and fixed some grammar/spelling
Jan
10
comment Are the SHA family hash outputs practically random?
If some characters were consistently less "random" than others that would indicate a severe flaw in the hash function.
Jan
6
answered How does Clifford Cocks 'Non-Secret Encryption' work?