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location Wellington, New Zealand
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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
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I am an undergraduate computer science and mathematics student in New Zealand. My fields of interest are computer graphics, in particular the physics of light transport, and to some extent cryptography, as well as programming and software development in general.


Jan
12
comment Why is the discrete logarithm problem assumed to be hard?
$O(n)$ is polynomial in the order of the group, in general polynomial-time means polynomial in the number of digits thereof, i.e. $O(\log^k(n))$. This is because we can make $n$ rather large easily (a few hundred digits), but making $\log(n)$ large is "much harder".
Jan
11
comment Cryptographically secure product keys
Have you considered the option of simply storing assigned product keys on the server securely?
Jan
10
reviewed Approve suggested edit on
Jan
10
reviewed Approve suggested edit on
Jan
10
revised ECDSA vs ECIES vs ECDH
proper abbreviations, and fixed some grammar/spelling
Jan
10
comment Are the SHA family hash outputs practically random?
If some characters were consistently less "random" than others that would indicate a severe flaw in the hash function.
Jan
6
answered How does Clifford Cocks 'Non-Secret Encryption' work?
Jan
5
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How can I solve congruence modulo N?
Jan
5
comment Is differential calculus related to RSA?
Every part of math is related to any other if you try hard enough.
Dec
22
comment Is a Mersenne-twister cryptographically secure if I truncate the output?
But again, if you think you know everything and are always right, go right ahead, no one can stop you. If you implement this, and your game becomes popular, and eventually someone discovers this, exploits it, and steals a bunch of money, you're going to have a hell of a time defending why you deviated from industry standards, tried to do better than everyone else, and lost. In fact this thread may even serve as evidence. And, yes, this does happen, very often. Good luck with your project.
Dec
22
comment Is a Mersenne-twister cryptographically secure if I truncate the output?
It's regrettable that the question as-is seems to imply that it's OK to do whatever the OP suggested. A shame for future visitors who may not have the insight of actually checking the rest of the thread, and end up using a homebrewed, brittle, and perhaps profoundly insecure PRNG as though it were a CSPRNG. I also like that you dismiss the entire field of cryptanalysis as if you were too good for it and just assume all your arguments are correct. Seriously, it's cool to be creative for experiments, but for a real project, no less an ONLINE CASINO GAME, you WANT to use best practices. NOT THIS.
Dec
22
awarded  Informed
Dec
21
comment How can uniformity of hash functions (e.g. SHA-256) be proved?
I'll leave it to someone else to write up a formal answer but I believe the short answer is that there is no proof. One can sort of offer mathematical arguments that SHA-256 is secure against such and such attack, or has such and such general property, but by and large it's just a matter of cryptographers around the world banging as hard as they can on it and seeing it if breaks. Symmetric cryptography is nothing like number-theoretic crypto which is much bigger on actual proofs (cf. factorization, DLP, DDH, ..)
Dec
21
comment Calculate entropy of key derived from PBKF2 function
@deltaaruna The salt is not (intended to be) secret, so it has zero entropy. The password has entropy $e$, and you use $2^k$ rounds - so the total amount of "work" in the computational sense to brute force the password is on the order of $2^k 2^e = 2^{k + e}$, so the "entropy" is $k + e$ (again, in the computational sense - the information-theoretical entropy of the key is at most the entropy of its inputs, but since it takes more work to verify your guess you can think of it as "extra passwords to check", e.g. 2 iterations = twice as many passwords to check computationally = +1 bit entropy).
Dec
20
comment Calculate entropy of key derived from PBKF2 function
(up to a maximum of the output length specified to the PBKDF2 algorithm)
Nov
30
comment Is this encryption scheme perfectly secure?
It's not really "the Caesar cipher", sure the Caesar cipher uses this primitive internally but is certainly not perfectly secure, so this is somewhat misleading. Otherwise good answer +1
Nov
26
comment password generation: random length or max length
@K.G. Quite true, and worth pointing out, though the increase in security is still negligible.
Nov
26
revised password generation: random length or max length
"smaller" to "shorter", 4 gramer!
Nov
26
revised password generation: random length or max length
fixed typo in equation
Nov
26
answered password generation: random length or max length