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Sep
22
comment Is it possible to hand-negotiate an SSL/TLS session?
No, it is not feasible or even theoretically possible to connect to a server on 443 and type yourself through an entire SSL handshake.
Sep
15
comment What is the technical name for a public key container in DER format?
If it's not a plain PKCS#1 RSAPublicKey, it is probably a SubjectPublicKeyInfo from PKIX/X.509
Sep
15
comment What is the technical name for a public key container in DER format?
Well, you don't have to take my word for it. All you have to do is to implement a Base64 decoder, an ASN.1 parser, a DER parser and see for yourself, just like I did. :)
Sep
15
comment What is the technical name for a public key container in DER format?
The format is PKCS#1 with PEM encoding. Your question is however off topic here.
Sep
15
comment Why would an RSA library tell me that the public key must be at least 512 bits in size?
Obviously, you can't use a 512 bit RSA key for generating sha512withRSAEncryption signatures. The restriction on key size might have to with more than just best practices.
Sep
3
comment Are SSL/TLS used for maintaining data confidentiality?
Please read the answer again. Data as a whole might not necessarily be confidential, just because it is encrypted. The hash functions are used for the message authentication codes and (in TLS 1.2 and up) for the PRF that is used e.g. for deriving bulk encryption keys. The description in the other answer crypto.stackexchange.com/a/18936/1564 is generally correct in this respect.
Aug
22
comment Why does DES use exactly 16 rounds?
@fgrieu You are probably correct.
Aug
12
comment Deterministic Rand function for Winternitz One Time Signatures
I need (at least) 256 bit outputs because the Winternitz OWF has a 256 bit output. I need (at least) a 256 bit key, because the risk of collisions in the leaf keys must nut exceed the risk of collisions in the message digest function. I need a 256 bit seed because the number of leafs is $2^{250}$ and the total number of independent leaf keys is $2^{256}$.
Aug
11
comment SHACAL in SHA-256
Yes, SHACAL-2 was e.g. selected as part of the NESSIE portfolio. However, it should be noted that some standard modes of operation don't have a 256-bit equivalent, such as GCM.
Aug
9
comment Discovering private exponent from public key
Correction: The order $q$ of $g$ is the least positive integer such that $1 = g^q \bmod N$. You are correct that an element $g$ is a generator of the multiplicative group if its order is $q = N-1$. Also please note that $N = 251$ isn't a safe prime, since $(N-1)/2 = 125$ isn't a prime.
Aug
9
comment Discovering private exponent from public key
The parameter $n$ in my answer is an arbitrary attack parameter that might be any value between $0$ and $128$.
Aug
9
comment Discovering private exponent from public key
@Joe In SRP, $g$ is supposed to be a generator of the multiplicative group, meaning that the order of $g$ should be $q = N-1$. Since $N$ is supposed to be a safe prime, the only other possible values are $q = (N-1)/2$, $q = 2$ and $q = 1$. Checking the order of $g$ is done by finding the least $q$ such that $g = g^q \bmod N$.
Aug
7
comment Interleaving bytes to make an effectively larger block size
If by "interleaving" you mean transposing, please see the second case in my answer. Your function has approximately the same collision rate as CBC mode or CFB mode under CPA, but at the expense of three AES invocations per 128 bits, instead of just one.
Aug
3
comment Cryptographically Secure Hash Algorithm with Very Specific Property
1. What exactly do the operators $\oplus$ and $+$ signify? Bitwise xor and string concatenation, or something else? 2. Are the $K_i$ values supposed to be of a fixed bit length, or do you want the relation to hold for inputs of any length?
Aug
1
comment Using Lattice-based cryptography for TLS\SSL
@XCore I work mostly with independent software vendors. For them, GPL is as prohibitive as patents.
Aug
1
comment Using Lattice-based cryptography for TLS\SSL
I think you might add the fact that NTRU is patented to the list of reasons. It doesn't have anything to do with cryptography, but it is a very strong reason for a lot of people to bend over backwards searching for alternatives.
Aug
1
comment Deterministic Rand function for Winternitz One Time Signatures
Does there exist a standard Salsa/ChaCha variant that uses a 256 bit nonce (for at least 256 bit outputs) as per the question? Do you mean BLAKE?
Jul
25
comment Deterministic Rand function for Winternitz One Time Signatures
I guess there are three reasons: 1. Underlying requirement to use a standard primitive (e.g. AES). 2. Ability to generate the values at arbitrary positions (due to GMSS). 3. As few key schedule executions as possible. FWIW, I presume these requirements will be met by SHAKE256 once the standardization is final.
Jul
17
comment Generalized Merkle Signatures, SHA-3 and Sakura
@Dingo13: The problem with recovering the OTS private keys, seems to make it infeasible for an adversary to produce an existential forgery from a GMSS signature, even if the depth parameter might be altered.
Jul
17
comment How long does it take to crack PBKDF2?
If $DK$ is e.g. used as a key for a symmetric encryption scheme and the attacker has access to some cipher text and partial information about the plain text, testing if a $(DK, Salt, Password)$ guess is correct usually doesn't require prior knowledge of $DK$.