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seen May 1 '13 at 16:27

Apr
28
comment detecting ROT13/base64 encryption
Thanks! Excellent explanation. Can a hash (e.g. md5) be considered a specific form of encoding too?
Apr
28
awarded  Scholar
Apr
28
accepted RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
Apr
28
comment RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
See this too please: security.stackexchange.com/questions/34961/…
Apr
28
comment RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
Can randomized padding completely prevent from such possibility?
Apr
28
awarded  Commentator
Apr
28
awarded  Editor
Apr
28
revised RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
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Apr
28
comment RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
@Ricky Demer, I think it is considered an important weakness in a cipher that an adversary can discover such thing from the ciphertext, so I guessed it should be somehow prevented by default (but i were not sure so I posted a question about it).
Apr
28
comment RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
It is optional?! Isn't it the default when using crypto libraries?
Apr
28
asked RSA - Ecrypting the same data with the same public key = same ciphertext?
Apr
26
comment detecting ROT13/base64 encryption
Please tell me what encoding means exactly? Is there any relation between it and encryption?
May
27
comment Is quantum key distribution safe against MITM attacks too?
can we possibly combine (use concurrently) classic methods/algorithms like symmetric and asymmetric encryption algorithms with QKD to make it more complete/strong? i mean for example we can defend against MITM attacks using standard public key cryptography methods. that is to say encrypt the key using classic methods before sending it over the quantum channel.
May
27
awarded  Supporter
May
27
comment Is quantum key distribution safe against MITM attacks too?
can u clarify your meaning of 'short shared secret' and 'longer shared secret' please?
May
27
asked Is quantum key distribution safe against MITM attacks too?
May
5
comment Creating an encryption key from several other keys and using hash functions
why do u pad k if it is smaller than 256 bits?
May
4
comment Creating an encryption key from several other keys and using hash functions
if u use 2^16 iterations for key stretching, u r adding just that number of bits to the security: 128+16=144, but if u use 256 bit keys and encryption, u achieve a much higher strength at a much lower cost, i think.
May
4
comment Creating an encryption key from several other keys and using hash functions
i use key stretching for password hashing. its cost is tolerable for a web site because register and login requests are only a (tiny) fraction of a web site's traffic. but using key stretching for other purposes may decrease the overall performance considerably. using 256 bit keys and encryption seems much better in this regard and results in comparable or indeed higher security.
May
4
comment Creating an encryption key from several other keys and using hash functions
AFAIK key stretching is needed because of the fact that passwords chosen by humans almost always have much lower entropy/permutations than automatically generated random keys. In the case of automatically generated random keys with sufficient entropy/permutations (i think 128 bit strength is still enough for most ordinary purposes) the computations are already done by scientists/mathematicians that obviously must have considered brute-force attacks. isn't it so?