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 Yearling
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Feb
1
comment how to define the Truncated Polynomial?
See for example purplemath.com/modules/polydiv.htm
Jan
31
answered how to define the Truncated Polynomial?
Dec
21
comment Secure, patent-free alternative to NTRU
You're right, the statement in PATENTS.md is not consistent with the GPL. That wasn't the intent, it is meant to be fully GPL-compliant. We're changing that now.
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Dec
20
answered Secure, patent-free alternative to NTRU
Dec
12
answered Reduced message expansion in NTRU
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
9
answered RSA: Letting $p$ and $q$ have different bit-size
Jan
7
comment Implementations of Ntru TLS
BTW, NTRU is now available under the GPL and other FOSS licenses: github.com/NTRUOpenSourceProject/ntru-crypto. The open-source version has not yet been fully integrated into CyaSSL though.
Nov
28
comment Is the “secure-as-worst-case” version of NTRU patented?
The patents are now available under GPL. Go use them!
Sep
10
answered Is the “secure-as-worst-case” version of NTRU patented?
Jul
24
answered Secret sharing scheme with possibility to change the secret
May
11
awarded  Yearling
Aug
6
awarded  Student
Aug
6
asked How long does it take to extract a key from a FIPS-140 Level 2 device?
May
19
comment NTRUEncrypt - Choose the initial random polynomial
If p = 3 then you're using trinary, so let's say that r, g and m have dr, dg, dm +1s and -1s respectively and f has df +1s and (df-1) -1s. To avoid decryption failures altogether you need p*2dr*2dg + (2df-1)*2dm < 128, so df, dm, dr, dg all need to be around sqrt(128) or, basically, 11. If you're taking them much larger than this you'll see significant numbers of decryption failures. You want to be able to take df etc to be around N/3. If you take q to be the power of 2 above (N^2)/9 you will certainly have no decryption failures. Lower values of q give you some risk.
May
17
comment NTRUEncrypt - Choose the initial random polynomial
For binary, df is the number of 1s; for trinary with "flat" f, you have df 1s and df-1 -1s (or you could define df so that there are df+1 1s and df -1s, it doesn't matter much); for trinary with form 1+pF, you have df +1s and df -1s.
May
16
answered NTRUEncrypt - Choose the initial random polynomial
May
13
awarded  Necromancer
May
11
awarded  Teacher