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seen Aug 19 at 11:06

Dec
24
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
30
awarded  Student
Oct
29
awarded  Scholar
Oct
29
accepted Why, or when, to use an Initialization Vector?
Oct
28
revised Why, or when, to use an Initialization Vector?
added 155 characters in body
Oct
28
comment Why, or when, to use an Initialization Vector?
Is there any attack to be had in my example; where i leave the IV always at zero?
Oct
28
awarded  Editor
Oct
28
comment Why, or when, to use an Initialization Vector?
@PaĆ­loEbermann In that case it would be whatever the "default" is; which is documented to be all zero's. But if AES doesn't support an IV, then i guess my IV is "undefined".
Oct
28
revised Why, or when, to use an Initialization Vector?
added 983 characters in body
Oct
28
asked Why, or when, to use an Initialization Vector?
May
13
comment Is it fair to assume that SHA1 collisions won't occur on a set of <100k strings
@owlstead "Is it fair to assume that SHA1 collisions won't occur on a set of <100k strings" Yes, it is fair to assume that SHA1 collisions won't occur on a set of <100k strings.
May
12
awarded  Teacher
May
12
answered Does a public key absolutely need to be used to initiate an encrypted session?
May
12
comment Time Capsule cryptography?
The downside of having a time capsule that you don't want opened until 20 years from now: is that you must spend 18 years encrypting the puzzle. Considering Moore's law it will then take 2 years for the public to decrypt it. Total: 20 years.
May
12
awarded  Supporter
May
12
answered Is it fair to assume that SHA1 collisions won't occur on a set of <100k strings