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I'm a Linux guy that loves managing Linux servers and workstations as part of my living. I don't spend much time on it simply because I don't need to. I love to answer questions that relate to Linux and try to do so when I have spare moments.

I'm a Linux guy that has to manage customers' Windows servers and workstations as part of my living. It pays well but I find it frustrating to have to deal with Windows-specific issues and interfaces when I could just be done already if I used my favorite tools. Sometimes I write programs in Go that help me manage the Windows machines and sometimes I just give up and ask for help here. I don't love Windows and I'm highly appreciative of the folks here that have clever answers for frustrating problems.

I'm a Go programmer that used to be a Perl programmer... and I love that it's part of my day job. I loved Perl very much, but there is just too much goodness in Go to stay on the Perl wagon. I love having a cross-platform language that packs its own runtime without needing to hack something together like I had to do with Perl. I haven't really answered much in the way of Go questions, but I'm certainly on the lookout for questions that aren't already answered well. I spend as much time as I can expanding my Go experience, especially when it comes to building cross-platform tools to help myself or my customers live a happier computer-using life.

I'm a father and a business owner. I love my kid more than anything else. Seriously, who doesn't say that? I already know I'm biased, but he's the best kid anyone could ask for. I run my own business and have done so though multiple relationships, several staffing changes, many city moves, a bunch of chemotherapy, and plenty of general business and life chaos. Through my business, I have provided valuable input to giant companies like Johnson & Johnson and Amazon.com all the way down to mom-and-pop-sized local businesses and many in between. Running my business has been an amazing amount of freedom and an incredible amount of burden. And it has been an incredible experience.


Sep
8
comment What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
I edited the question a little bit to be more accurate with what it is I'm wishing to do. In this particular use case, it seems that if this described situation is insufficient, I would not be confident in storing the user keys.
Sep
8
revised What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
added 150 characters in body
Sep
8
comment What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
The only difference is that I'm actually using the public keys, not just verifying a shared secret. Without access to the underlying filesystem or some sort of sniffing, you can't know the full URL without knowing the user ID and the user passphrase. One could brute force their way to find a key, but doing so would be no less difficult than if they were brute forcing a typical login form. I would like to hear more specifics about the bits-of-entropy topic with regard to this particular question.
Sep
7
awarded  Scholar
Sep
7
accepted What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
Sep
7
comment What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
None of that sounds like new info, but it certainly is valuable nonetheless and is appreciated. One of the important details is that the passphrase on the key would be hardened via some key stretching mechanism in order to make local brute force attempts extremely expensive. The keys would, hopefully, be rotated frequently enough such that it would be unlikely that a key could be brute-forced successfully while it's still a usable key. Thanks for your response on this; it's appreciated.
Jul
6
awarded  Student
May
25
comment What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
My present understanding is that the only way into the key is via brute forcing. Also, I suggest that this is more secure than a database of password hashes. Unless someone can break into S3 or get the S3 account privileges, no one can list the keys on the server but have to know the URL in order to download a single key, which I suggest is no more security-by-obscurity than a password.
May
25
awarded  Editor
May
25
revised What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?
deleted 2 characters in body
May
25
awarded  Supporter
May
25
asked What is the harm if I publish an encrypted RSA private key publicly?