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Feb
11
awarded  Editor
Feb
11
revised Analogue encryption algorithms
After CodesInChaos' edit, the "we" refers to nothing anymore. Also it sounds a bit nationalistic/opinionated.
Feb
11
suggested approved edit on Analogue encryption algorithms
Jan
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Sep
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Mar
16
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
I mean WW I/II, not WO. WO is "wereldoorlog," the Dutch term for world war. My bad.
Mar
16
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
But how would the random number generator work? How could you deterministically generate an analog signal without a digital system? So something that could have worked in WO I/II, where microprocessors to generate/process digital data were not available.
Mar
15
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
Thanks for the elaborate answer, but still, none of these do actual "encryption" (where I define encryption as a signal that cannot be distinguished from white noise) without digital components. I wouldn't trust any of these to be illegible to an advanced attacker, like I would with AES, and thus not use them for anything beyond obfuscation.
Mar
15
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
Downvoter: I don't mind you downvoting, but please tell me what was wrong so I can improve it!
Feb
20
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
@aland It's not what I'm looking for since it has already been cracked, but thanks for your reply!
Feb
19
asked Analogue encryption algorithms
Sep
16
comment Why is AES resistant to known-plaintext attacks?
"nobody was successful" 2013/nsa update: "as far as we know..."
Jul
22
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Jul
22
accepted Technical feasibility of decrypting https by replacing the computer's PRNG
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Jul
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Jul
14
comment Technical feasibility of decrypting https by replacing the computer's PRNG
Useful information, thanks for your answer! And you mention a very legitimate question: What's in it for Intel besides becoming good mates with the NSA? Merely being good mates doesn't bring them much profit. Yet they could still say it's secure crypto, and it is as long as nobody knows the initial state. They might just get away with it in the corporate world. But I'm just guessing really.
Jul
14
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