348 reputation
149
bio website lucb1e.com
location The Netherlands
age
visits member for 2 years
seen Jul 22 at 11:08

Software Engineering student from The Netherlands. Also interested in computer networking and security. See also: lucb1e.com/!about


Mar
16
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
I mean WW I/II, not WO. WO is "wereldoorlog," the Dutch term for world war. My bad.
Mar
16
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
But how would the random number generator work? How could you deterministically generate an analog signal without a digital system? So something that could have worked in WO I/II, where microprocessors to generate/process digital data were not available.
Mar
15
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
Thanks for the elaborate answer, but still, none of these do actual "encryption" (where I define encryption as a signal that cannot be distinguished from white noise) without digital components. I wouldn't trust any of these to be illegible to an advanced attacker, like I would with AES, and thus not use them for anything beyond obfuscation.
Mar
15
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
Downvoter: I don't mind you downvoting, but please tell me what was wrong so I can improve it!
Feb
20
comment Analogue encryption algorithms
@aland It's not what I'm looking for since it has already been cracked, but thanks for your reply!
Sep
16
comment Why is AES resistant to known-plaintext attacks?
"nobody was successful" 2013/nsa update: "as far as we know..."
Jul
14
comment Technical feasibility of decrypting https by replacing the computer's PRNG
Useful information, thanks for your answer! And you mention a very legitimate question: What's in it for Intel besides becoming good mates with the NSA? Merely being good mates doesn't bring them much profit. Yet they could still say it's secure crypto, and it is as long as nobody knows the initial state. They might just get away with it in the corporate world. But I'm just guessing really.
Jul
14
comment Technical feasibility of decrypting https by replacing the computer's PRNG
Hmm I think I get it. I was thinking "how'd you make it seem random while knowing the output" and an encryption algorithm is the obvious answer. But then how do you know how far into the output stream the PRNG is? Well you don't really need to, deducing that is much faster (just reproduce the output stream and test everything) than cracking true randomness. Use the chip's serial + a static salt as first input, then make the PRNG's state persistent between reboots. That could probably totally work. Waiting for other answers, but I'll accept soon if none are added. Thanks for your answer!
Oct
7
comment understanding a length extension attack
Been wanting to ask the same but forgot! Is this by any chance in response to some blogpost unclearly explaining the 7th level of Stripe's CTF challenge?