183 reputation
4
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location Romania
age 29
visits member for 2 years
seen Feb 18 at 7:09


Jan
27
revised How cryptographically secure was the original WW2 Enigma machine, from a modern viewpoint?
added 2 characters in body
Jan
27
comment How cryptographically secure was the original WW2 Enigma machine, from a modern viewpoint?
If I understood the real WW2 events which lead to the cracking of Enigma correctly, the operator mistakes were useful to actually discover the "algorithm" itself. How would modern cryptanalysts with modern tools to their disposal discover the algorithm of an Enigma-like machine without putting their hands on a physical copy of the machine?
Jan
27
asked How cryptographically secure was the original WW2 Enigma machine, from a modern viewpoint?
Mar
29
accepted A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
Dec
19
comment A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
@mikeazo : you are right, I see now that my formulation was unclear. I corrected it. I don't know what percent of microcontrollers have this feature, but I assume either all or at least most of the modern ones.
Dec
19
revised A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
added 11 characters in body
Dec
19
comment A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
@mikeazo : microcontrollers have fuses which prevent reading the contents. You would need an electron-microscope and lot of time and expertise to read out the contents of a protected flash memory. Much higher costs than developing the desired software from scratch.
Dec
19
comment A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
@fgrieu : the method described does not prevent theft in the form of deliberately leaking the software (due to a very small team this risk is negligible), but that was not the intention. The intention was to prevent theft from the publicly released update.
Dec
19
awarded  Editor
Dec
19
revised A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
deleted 4 characters in body
Dec
19
asked A situation where security by obscurity might be the best solution - or am I wrong?
Oct
4
awarded  Scholar
Oct
4
accepted Is there any recent cryptographic algorithm especially designed for low-level processors?
Jul
20
awarded  Student
Jul
19
comment Is there any recent cryptographic algorithm especially designed for low-level processors?
@No, it's not a concern. The microcontroller is secured against reading, and the scope of the problem is small enough that I don't need rotating passwords or similar procedures. A single symmetric key will then be sufficient.
Jul
19
comment Is there any recent cryptographic algorithm especially designed for low-level processors?
@RickyDemer: Why? It's not important for me to have the same key for encryption/decryption, neither do I wish to identify the source of the file. I just want to provide a file that the PC program can send to the microcontroller, without the user being able to understand its content. The file, the PC program and the mincrocontroller are all provided by me, not necessarily in the same package.
Jul
19
comment Is there any recent cryptographic algorithm especially designed for low-level processors?
@RickyDemer: not necessarily.
Jul
19
comment Is there any recent cryptographic algorithm especially designed for low-level processors?
No. The plaintext is generated at a time and place inaccessible to the user of the PC program, so it can be released already encrypted.
Jul
19
awarded  Supporter
Jul
19
comment Is there any recent cryptographic algorithm especially designed for low-level processors?
It doesn't have to be symmetric. I intend to have a PC program send a file to a microcontroller, but the user of that PC program should not be able to access the data in that file or edit its contents in a meaningful way. I intend to place the decryption part into the microcontroller, to deny the possibility to read the data by tapping the wire between it and the PC.