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Jan
12
reviewed Approve Two mutually untrusted parties want to exchange data: how to ensure each one gets the data it needs?
Jan
12
revised Compressing EC private keys
typo
Jan
12
comment Compressing EC private keys
@PulpSpy: it might be a gallicism (i.e. a French term which I did not care to translate to English). "Alea" itself is latin for "fate" or "randomness". "Pseudo-alea" means "looks like random bits, but are generated through a deterministic process with an unknown seed".
Jan
12
answered Is it possible to distinguish a securely-encrypted ciphertext from random noise?
Jan
12
answered Compressing EC private keys
Jan
12
answered Two mutually untrusted parties want to exchange data: how to ensure each one gets the data it needs?
Jan
11
comment Does the position of the salt improve its effectiveness when hashing?
@Jim: I am saying position matters in subtle ways for which there cannot exist a simple answer such as "prefix is better than suffix" or the opposite. The only simple answer there is, is: "don't try it at home, it's dangerous".
Jan
11
answered Does the position of the salt improve its effectiveness when hashing?
Jan
11
comment Feedback on rolling my own entropy gatherer
@DavidSchwartz: that's exactly how /dev/urandom works on FreeBSD: it blocks until a big enough seed has been obtained, and then never after. Linux's /dev/urandom is broken in that respect (it will accept to output data before having obtained enough bytes) but Linux distributions fix that by recording at each boot a random seed in a file, which will be used upon next boot. As for gathering additional entropy afterwards, it does not harm, as long as it is cheap (not gathering extra entropy being always, by definition, the cheapest option).
Jan
10
comment Feedback on rolling my own entropy gatherer
@JimMcKeeth: never ! A 256-bit random seed is good enough until the end of times -- the end of your times, that is, including your grandchildren's grandchildren. That's what computational indistinguishability is about: 300 years of computation with all the world's computers are not enough to get it through. In practice, a PRNG needs a new seed upon boot and until next time the machine is shut off.
Jan
10
answered Feedback on rolling my own entropy gatherer
Jan
10
answered Would it be secure to use random numbers from random.org in a cryptographic solution?
Jan
10
comment RSA cracking: The same message is sent to two different people problem
Note that such "cracking" entails using RSA without padding (so it is not "the" RSA, only the core mathematical operation, but known to have a number of weaknesses), and also that Smith and Jones share the same modulus, which means that they have the "same" private key (at least they both know the factorization of the modulus, so they can compute each other's private key). That's not a realistic situation.
Jan
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
8
revised group-theory wiki description
added 454 characters in body
Jan
8
answered DES Crack simulation
Jan
7
reviewed Approve blowfish tag wiki excerpt
Jan
7
reviewed Approve blowfish tag wiki
Jan
7
wiki created group-theory description
Jan
6
answered Is it possible to create an easy to use encryption/decryption method that will never be comprimised?