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Oct
2
comment Paillier Crypto System : Pros and Cons?
Please also make sure to describe what research you've done. We expect you to show some evidence of effort on your own before asking. Make sure to read the help center.
Oct
2
comment Extracting only the entropy
@Blaze, careful there. There is no good way to do accurate entropy estimation (at least not in general, without knowing anything about the source). But be careful about what inferences you draw. That doesn't mean /dev/random is no good. In general, there's a lot of work on this sort of topic; I encourage you to read up on it before drawing too many conclusions.
Oct
2
comment Extracting only the entropy
@CodesInChaos, Ahh, that might explain it. Thank you! That would suggest the follow-up question: why does he/she want that? If we knew the source of this requirement, there might be a better solution. (Especially when /dev/random already exists...)
Oct
2
comment Extracting only the entropy
I don't know what you mean by "inject pseudo entropy". A hash does not inject entropy. I'm not familiar with "pseudo entropy" as a technical term. Can you tell us more about what your real problem is? You might want to edit the question to provide more context and to explain the particular application setting and what you're trying to achieve or what problem you're trying to fix.
Oct
1
answered Extracting only the entropy
Oct
1
comment Estimating bits of entropy
Can you tell us more? Why do you want to measure the amount of entropy? What do you know about the source of the byte stream? The answer is going to depend heavily on the answers to these questions and on other details, so if you can give us more details, we might be more likely to be able to give you a good answer. This is not a simple subject with a simple one-line answer...
Oct
1
comment How to calculate y value from ((y*y) mod prime) efficiently
Duplicate of crypto.stackexchange.com/q/6518/351
Sep
30
answered Why should I make my cipher public?
Sep
30
answered Non-interactive proof that an element is in a subgroup
Sep
30
revised Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?
Try to clarify that I'm just repeating the blog post, not vouching for its accuracy.
Sep
30
accepted Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?
Sep
30
comment Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?
@K.G., actually, no, I have it right in the question. Remember, I am summarizing the criticisms/concerns raised in the blog post. I have accurately quoted the concerns listed in that blog post. If you mean to suggest that the blog post has it wrong, feel free to post an answer explaining (indeed, I do suspect some possible confusion in the blog post; that's one of the things I was asking about) -- but it's not an error in the question.
Sep
30
comment What are requirements for this grille?
I don't understand the question. What makes you think there are any requirements on the grille? Where does this talk of rotation come from? As far as I know, there is no rotation: you use the grille you have. It looks to me like the question starts from erroneous premises. In any case, I'm having a hard time understanding what you are asking or what the question is; you might need to edit the question to provide more details and more motivation/justification for your assumptions (e.g., what rotation has to do with anything).
Sep
30
answered Friedman Index of Coincidence, pruning multiples of the keylength
Sep
30
comment how to mathematically prove a key exchange algorithm
Welcome to Crypto.SE! Unfortunately, this question is probably too broad and open-ended to be a good fit for this site. What have you studied so far? What's the real problem you have in front of you? What's the context and motivation for your problem? Providing a more detailed and narrowly focused question makes it more likely that it will be possible to provide a useful answer, within the constraints of a StackExchange site.
Sep
30
comment Friedman Index of Coincidence, pruning multiples of the keylength
OK. I suspect, when the IC was invented, it was typically used together with human judgement, so there might not be any standard rules to address this issue. Anyway, it seems like it might be easy to add a special case for this situation: choose the one with the highest IC, except that if it has a divisor whose IC is within 5% of it, choose the divisor. Another plausible solution would be to try running the rest of your attack on both candidates. I would imagine either of these might work fine. Have you tried either of these approaches?
Sep
30
comment Friedman Index of Coincidence, pruning multiples of the keylength
Do you need a solution that is 100% automated (no human involvement), or are you OK with involving human judgement? If the latter, it seems pretty easy for a human to recognize this situation and choose the smaller keylength.
Sep
30
revised Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?
added 57 characters in body
Sep
30
comment Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?
Personally, I am skeptical that there is anything to worry about here, but I'm interested in a better answer about whether we should be concerned.
Sep
30
asked Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?