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Jan
5
comment (Re-)Using deterministic IV in CTR mode / How to: deterministic AES
@SebastianS, I can't understand what you are saying. (If you generate the IV as a hash of the plaintext, you'll still need to store it somewhere too, so I don't understand what your requirements/objections are.)
Jan
5
comment Is BBS used for generation of keys for any modem cryptosystem?
@111, right, but: if it doesn't have a security proof, then BBS has no advantages over competing schemes, so there would be no good reason to choose BBS.
Jan
5
answered Is a Combined Linear Congruential Generator secure for cryptography?
Jan
5
asked Difference between statistical PRNG and cryptographic PRNG?
Jan
5
answered Is BBS used for generation of keys for any modem cryptosystem?
Jan
5
answered (Re-)Using deterministic IV in CTR mode / How to: deterministic AES
Jan
5
comment Is a Combined Linear Congruential Generator secure for cryptography?
1. What research have you done? 2. What precisely is a Combined Linear Congruential Generator? 3. What makes you think it would be cryptographically secure? If it wasn't designed to be cryptographically secure, or wasn't vetted for that purpose, it probably isn't.
Jan
5
comment Luby-Rackoff on Feistel ciphers
Can you provide a self-contained description of the claim in those lecture notes (without requiring us to click elsewhere, and without relying upon a link that could disappear at any time)? How many rounds are we talking about? What kind of Feistel cipher?
Jan
5
answered Analyzing security flaws of cipher
Dec
29
awarded  Populist
Dec
22
comment Why shouldn't I use ECB encryption?
1. This is not good advice. Using encryption without authentication disregards about a decade of advice from cryptographers. Better would be to use authenticated encryption, as Ilmari Karonen recommends. 2. This answer seems to be superceded by Ilmari Karonen's answer.
Dec
22
comment Why shouldn't I use ECB encryption?
We expect you to do a significant amount of research before asking, and show what you've tried in your question. Seriously? You're asking why not to use ECB? The reasons are documented in about a billion places -- in textbooks, on the Internet (try a Google search), on Wikipedia, and on this site (as others have pointed out). Please do more research before asking. This is not a suitable question for this site.
Dec
16
comment How broken is a xor of two LCGs?
@RamchandraApte, OK, you probably know more about x86-64 than I do. Would you like to do a back-of-the-envelope estimate of the performance of this stream cipher, on x86-64? How many cycles does a 64x64 multiple take?
Dec
10
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
30
comment Does MD5 hash have quasi commutative property?
What do you mean by quasi-commutative? Please expand your question with additional details, examples, etc. to clarify what you are asking. Also, tell us what you've tried and what research you've done.
Nov
30
comment Issue about randomness : what if random looks “human” ?
What do you mean by "what if"? (Yeah, well, it could happen. So what?) I honestly can't tell what your question is. Are you looking for a discussion, or do you have a specific technical question you are looking for an answer to? "What would we say?" is not a specific technical question.
Nov
30
comment transforming RC2 keys to have effective minimum length in implementations with fixed effective lengths
Why are you using RC2? Don't use RC2. It's not a good choice for any new design. Use a better cryptosystem, e.g., AES in an authenticated encryption mode.
Nov
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
10
comment repeating-key xor and hamming distance
Hi @GabeHollombe, for new questions, I recommend you post a new question. But the short answer is: yes. If you guessed the key length correctly, you're looking at $\text{wt}(X \oplus K \oplus Y \oplus K) = \text{wt}(X \oplus Y)$, which is 2-3 bits. If you guessed it incorrectly, you're looking at $\text{wt}(X \oplus K \oplus Y \oplus K')$, which is about 3 bits (here all of $X,Y,K,K'$ are independently distributed English ASCII letters). ASCII lowercase letters are 0x61 to 0x7A, so the xor of four of those is close to uniform on its low 6 bits, and thus has 3 bits set on average.
Nov
9
comment Which attacks are possible against raw/textbook RSA?
What research have you done? There's lots written on this. See, e.g., Dan Boneh's survey. Or, search on "textbook RSA" on this site (or elsewhere) and you'll find many references.