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Aug
25
comment Generating an IV for ESP 3DES-CBC
I don't recommend using /dev/random, for a number of reasons (do a search here or on IT Security.SE to see why). Instead, use /dev/urandom or any crypto-quality pseudorandom number genreator.
Aug
25
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
[..] Also, w.h.p, the real key $K$ is the only key that fulfills all of these requirements, since there are about $2^{1780380}$ such input sequences and only about $1/2^{1000000}$ of them are consistent with the known keystream and only about $(1-1/e)^{1185858}=1/2^{784715}$ of the remainder pass the rest of the tests. Therefore, this attack will find the real key $K$ and output it.
Aug
25
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
Here's an attack that breaks your scheme. Suppose we have 1000000 bits of known (debiased) keystream. Guess $K$. Guess a 1876000-bit sequence containing at most 690142 0's; it is a possible input to the von Neumann debiaser. Test whether applying von Neumann debiasing to this yields the known keystream; reject if not. Guess $M_i$ for each position $i$ where this sequence has a 1 bit. Test whether $H(K,N,i,M_i)=0$ for each such $i$; reject if not. If all tests pass, accept and output $K$. w.h.p, the debiaser only needed $\le 1876000$ bits of input, and at most 690142 in its input were 0's. [..]
Aug
23
comment what is pairing in cryptography?
What reading have you done? What effort have you made? Have you looked in Wikipedia? Have you looked in modern textbooks? Have you searched via Google? Have you read course notes on the topic? We expect you to do some investigation on your own before asking here: ask only questions that you actually care about -- and if you care about it, do a little research on your own. In this case, it is very easy to find basic information on pairings (e.g., on Wikipedia).
Aug
23
comment The specification of modern, non-communicating cipher machinery
These questions all seem pretty standard, for applied cryptography. Have you read Cryptography Engineering, by Ferguson, Schneier, and Kohno? Or other good textbooks on applied cryptography? They'll tell you about things like how long your IV should be, why you need a message authentication code, how to resynchronize after corruption, etc. You should start by studying what is already known about computer-based systems, then analyze for yourself how they apply to your situation, and come back if there's anything that you can't work out from the standard references.
Aug
22
comment Create a field in PBC
What you want to do has nothing to do with pairing-based cryptography. Why would you want to use PBC, or something related to pairings?
Aug
22
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
@PaŭloEbermann, thank you, yes, that's a good summary (with the caveat that you have to be able to verify whether your guess was correct or not).
Aug
22
comment Is a 1024-bit DSA key considered safe?
@bdesham, sorry, I don't know the answer to your second question. I don't know of any way to replace it without revoking it and creating a whole new key, but maybe someone else will know.
Aug
22
comment How can I accomplish Key Derivation in JavaScript?
@AbhiBeckert, If you want advice on how to get the best possible security for your web service, I recommend you ask a question that describes your web service, your security needs, your requirements, your user population, and similar information. We can't read your mind; and it's hard to provide a useful answer without that information. As it is, I can only answer the question you asked (whether it's possible to take a weak password and turn it into a strong crypto key); the answer is no, you can't. It doesn't matter how inconvenient that answer is for users; the answer remains correct.
Aug
21
comment How resilient to attackers with extreme resources available is this encryption method?
@Everlag, the short answer is you can't: you need to rely upon something more than just a passphrase. The simple answer is to use public-key key exchange as others have suggested (e.g., like SSL). Or, maybe you need secure storage somewhere (where the private key can be stored securely; possibly encrypted under the passphrase); maybe you need a hardware device or token or smartcard; maybe you need something else. It's hard to tell you what the best approach will be, without knowing anything of the application requirements or restrictions or goals beyond that you want very strong cryptography.
Aug
21
comment Understanding the “cube-root math” behind an RSA signature forgery
hlh, sorry, I don't understand your question. The paper explains why the answer is $2^{1019} - (N * 2^{34}/3)$. They've already given you this answer (magically) and are now explaining how you can verify that this answer is correct. Plug in $A=2^{1019}$, $B=N*2^{34}/3$ into (7), exactly as the paper tells you do, and then simplify, and then the paper tells you why the cube of $2^{1019} - (N * 2^{34}/3)$ is $2^{3057}-N*2^{2072}+G$.
Aug
21
comment Strength of CBC with Ciphertext Stealing
This doesn't really answer the OP's question, which was about the degree of risk due to leaking the length. This is the one respect in which CBC-CTS does not achieve the same level of security as plain CBC, as CBC-CTS leaks more precise information about the plaintext length.
Aug
21
comment Understanding the “cube-root math” behind an RSA signature forgery
The paper explains how it got this number immediately after the expression you are quoting. See equations (7) and (8) and the surrounding text (continuing onto the top of the next page).
Aug
20
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
"You appear to assume that if there is no such path, you don't get any usable output" - Yes, that's right. I agree: that's exactly the heart of it. See my comment on the question, where I asked for clarification about what the original poster (user8007) had in mind in this regard. I'm going based upon my best attempt at interpreting user8007's answer as well as my limited understanding of complexity theory. Do you know of any reference which suggests which is the right formulation? If so, can you share a reference where I can learn more? I'd love to learn more!
Aug
20
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
(cont.) It is easy to find a condition under which Bob accepts and outputs that $i=1$, but no amount of non-determinism is enough for Bob to accept and output that $i=0$. (There's no single guess that lets Bob verify that there is no solution to your equation. If Bob guesses one value of $M$ and find it isn't a solution to the equation, he has no idea whether some other value of $M$ might be a solution.) Encryption has the same problem. So, your example is not valid: neither encryption nor decryption can be computed using a non-deterministic algorithm.
Aug
20
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
Oops, forget everything I wrote earlier! I just figured out what I missed. Your example is no good because Bob cannot decrypt. Try writing out a non-deterministic algorithm Bob can use to decrypt. To see this, just try writing a non-det. algorithm Bob can use to compute a single biased bit $i$. Make sure you remember the rules of non-deterministic algorithms: you have to specify the criteria under which Bob accepts or rejects. What is the condition under which Bob accepts and outputs that $i=0$ (that there is no solution $M$)? Try to write it down -- you'll see you are stuck. (cont.)
Aug
19
comment Is there a security proof for the Triple-DES construction in the ideal cipher model?
@RickyDemer, I thought you were curious about whether 2-key 3DES is more secure than single DES (rather than whether it's more secure than double DES), and I believe the Aiello paper does demonstrate one sense in which it is. Anyway, it's not important -- if the Aiello paper isn't what you were looking for, I'm fine with that! The other papers should still be useful.
Aug
18
comment Textbook-RSA meet-in-the-middle attack against other RSA based schemes?
nlognfan, I see your comment that you are unable to edit your question or accept an answer. Make sure you are logged in as nlognfan. If you have lost access to that account, please try the account recovery process (or try clicking "click here to recover your account" on the sign-in page) and the StackExchange OpenID recovery page; if neither of those works for you, contact team@stackoverflow.com with as much information as you have to ask them to help you regain access.
Aug
16
comment Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?
It's not clear to me how you were expecting to use a non-deterministic Turing machine to encrypt. A non-deterministic Turing machine has many possible execution traces (and, typically, many possible outputs). How will you select which one to use as the ciphertext? For deciding/recognizing a language, we say that the input is treated as accepted if any of the possible execution traces accepts. What do you plan to do about this for encryption? The answer to the question might depend upon what you have in mind here.
Aug
12
comment Is it possible to subtract/multiply numbers using homomorphic encryption?
Have you read the Wikipedia article on homomorphic encryption? That'd be a good starting point. Also, search on this site. I think you'll find some answers....