631 reputation
317
bio website lamontconsulting.com
location New York, NY
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 18 at 18:54

SSL isn't good enough. Your website can be hacked.
Help solve the problem by advocating these RFCs:

TLSA (formerly DANE for DNS) Fixes the hackable CA problem

TLS-OBC: Fixes TLS, and the Related Domain Cookie Attack


About me
I have no relation to the above sites; I am just an advocate

Why "makerofthings7"? It's a challenge to "make seven things in my life of significant quality and value". Who knows if those things will take the form of software, art, or people. (I'm not married, no kids yet)

See ...my LinkedIn profile


Apr
22
comment LT codes with Homomorphic hashing
Dumb question: What does the symbol ⊕ mean?
Apr
11
comment How can two UProve token holders prove to a 3rd party that they aren't the same user?
I see it here.. will read it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_signature
Apr
11
comment How can two UProve token holders prove to a 3rd party that they aren't the same user?
I'm very interested in learning how this would operate, though the Wiki page for ecash is of no use, and all the pages are dead. Do you have any more info or references so I can understand what you mean by a "blind signature on a serial number"... and it's removal?
Mar
27
comment How can two UProve token holders prove to a 3rd party that they aren't the same user?
So that means the issuer needs N attributes, and selectively disclosing them one by one? I suppose I need to mention that the quantity of locations the UProve user will be dealing with numbers in the the millions. A UProve token with just 255 proofs takes quite a long time to generate. I hope there is another solution.
Mar
27
asked How can two UProve token holders prove to a 3rd party that they aren't the same user?
Mar
20
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
This is very helpful and is a great starting point for my independent studies (even the terms are helpful). Since the Key based approach is based on RSA primes, and I'm trying to integrate with UProve (based on the intractable discrete logarithm problem) is it possible to adapt your line of thinking into this type of mathematical foundation? I'm doing thought experiments on using UProve to display a constant to Alice1 and a different constant when speaking to Alice2... AliceN. Charlie could deduce Bobs ID across every Alice, but the consortium of Alice's couldn't do the same without Bob.
Mar
19
comment Hashing or encrypting twice to increase security?
FYI - This answer was referenced on Bitcoin.SE
Mar
15
comment What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
Aaah "Group Theory" that is what I needed! Thank you @RickyDemer
Mar
14
comment What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
Thank you @RickyDemer . I'm not familiar with the symbols ℤ∗P let alone how to type it correctly in Markup. Rather than bore this forum with these questions (unless it's on-topic), what should I learn (where should I learn it) to speak this language?
Mar
14
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
I'm fascinated by this subject matter.. if you have links to delegation or revocation that would be tremendously helpful.
Mar
14
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
Does either system allow for Bob to anonymously assert Age > 21 so that each assertion can't be correlated among different relying parties?
Mar
14
comment What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
@RickyDemer Just as there is something called the Discreet Logarithm problem that's used in crypto, I think this has a name in the crypto world. I'm short on meaningful vocabulary but think this has 1) a name, 2) a context it's considered useful , 3) Other proofs that may make it useful in various applications.
Mar
13
revised What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
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Mar
13
asked What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
Mar
13
accepted Learning cryptography using a FPGA
Mar
13
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
I think much of this is addressed by MSFT's UProve technology, but I haven't heard anything new about it in 2 years
Mar
12
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
How much depth should you go into? I admit I'm not that well versed in all the mathematics (and symbols) of cryptography but I will study whatever you share until I understand it completely/100%. I'll study the 101 terminology wherever it's offered.
Mar
12
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
@RickyDemer If Bob did publish something, Alice shouldn't know it, or shouldn't be able to use it for anything useful, lest Bob's purchases get correlated (Sweaters, and amazon purchases). There should be something that prevents forwarding Bob's credentials. One idea is Alice should send a challenge to Bob, (so the exchange is bound to the current session) and Bob sends Charlie's verification (of Bob's relative age and address) to Alice.
Mar
12
revised What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
added 509 characters in body
Mar
12
revised What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
added 301 characters in body