717 reputation
419
bio website lamontconsulting.com
location New York, NY
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Jan 21 at 12:40

SSL isn't good enough. Your website can be hacked.
Help solve the problem by advocating these RFCs:

TLSA (formerly DANE for DNS) Fixes the hackable CA problem

TLS-OBC: Fixes TLS, and the Related Domain Cookie Attack


About me
I have no relation to the above sites; I am just an advocate

Why "makerofthings7"? It's a challenge to "make seven things in my life of significant quality and value". Who knows if those things will take the form of software, art, or people. (I'm not married, no kids yet)

See ...my LinkedIn profile


Mar
15
comment What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
Aaah "Group Theory" that is what I needed! Thank you @RickyDemer
Mar
14
comment What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
Thank you @RickyDemer . I'm not familiar with the symbols ℤ∗P let alone how to type it correctly in Markup. Rather than bore this forum with these questions (unless it's on-topic), what should I learn (where should I learn it) to speak this language?
Mar
14
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
I'm fascinated by this subject matter.. if you have links to delegation or revocation that would be tremendously helpful.
Mar
14
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
Does either system allow for Bob to anonymously assert Age > 21 so that each assertion can't be correlated among different relying parties?
Mar
14
comment What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
@RickyDemer Just as there is something called the Discreet Logarithm problem that's used in crypto, I think this has a name in the crypto world. I'm short on meaningful vocabulary but think this has 1) a name, 2) a context it's considered useful , 3) Other proofs that may make it useful in various applications.
Mar
13
revised What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
added 49 characters in body
Mar
13
asked What is the significance of i^Q mod P = 1 and are there any special properties to be aware of?
Mar
13
accepted Learning cryptography using a FPGA
Mar
13
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
I think much of this is addressed by MSFT's UProve technology, but I haven't heard anything new about it in 2 years
Mar
12
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
How much depth should you go into? I admit I'm not that well versed in all the mathematics (and symbols) of cryptography but I will study whatever you share until I understand it completely/100%. I'll study the 101 terminology wherever it's offered.
Mar
12
comment What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
@RickyDemer If Bob did publish something, Alice shouldn't know it, or shouldn't be able to use it for anything useful, lest Bob's purchases get correlated (Sweaters, and amazon purchases). There should be something that prevents forwarding Bob's credentials. One idea is Alice should send a challenge to Bob, (so the exchange is bound to the current session) and Bob sends Charlie's verification (of Bob's relative age and address) to Alice.
Mar
12
revised What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
added 509 characters in body
Mar
12
revised What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
added 301 characters in body
Mar
12
asked What crypto system allows for 3 parties: Party 1 who makes an assertion, Party 2 mutates the assertion, Party 3 validates it
Feb
14
awarded  Critic
Feb
11
accepted How do other, non-RSA algorithms, compare to the PKCS #1 standard?
Feb
11
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
15
comment Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?
@Thomas FYI The +3 votes came from Security.SE, not the more discriminating Crypto.SE site, who could (and probably already did) write a book on this. I'd have to think about how to slice this up, but feel free to edit as you think ...
Dec
14
revised Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?
migrated to new site... get new tags
Dec
14
asked Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?