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Feb
5
comment How to check the strength of an encryption algorithm?
I doubt that it conforms to the general guiding principles of this forum that one posts a particular algorithm and asks how to check whether it is secure enough or not. Could someone clarify that issue?
Feb
5
comment Any implication of a Yale result to security of quantum cryptology?
There is a very recent paper arxiv.org/abs/1301.7351 by R. Anderson and R. Brady entitled "Why quantum computing is hard - and quantum cryptography is not provably secure". I should very much appreciate it, if some experts could evaluate that paper.
Feb
4
comment Entropy in natural language texts
I meant that, if a good lower estimate is known, one could, to be conservative, use a somewhat still smaller value and thus be able with a rather simply coding to obtain letter sequences that achieve sufficiently high entropy value for practical use. (The main point is simplicity.)
Feb
4
comment Generate random number which should depend on key
If something can't be simply twisted to work, one has to look for alternatives. I suppose that a sufficiently good scheme that can be adapted for use in your applications could be RC4, see Wiki.
Feb
4
comment Entropy in natural language texts
The book I read does say that was Turing's estimate of "entropy". So I don't understand yet your critique concerning the estimate as such. It could well be though that one should use a revised value nowadays. Simplicity I meant refers mainly to the concept and coding.
Feb
4
comment Entropy in natural language texts
Firstly, it could serve other purposes than "directly" for encryption, for example to generate keys for ciphers. Secondly, if it turns out to be a satisfactory way to obtain entropy-rich sequences, than its usage as key stream for stream encryption would also be practically feasible. Awkwardness you mentioned is a rather subjective issue. What really counts would be simplicity and that is the case with the scheme IMHO.
Feb
4
comment Entropy in natural language texts
For practical applications, one commonly doesn't always necessarily require theoretical unconditional security. No crypto algorithm used in practice is absolutely theoretically secure IMHO. In other words, one does compromises to achieve one's purposes in some presumably optimal way.
Feb
4
asked Entropy in natural language texts
Feb
3
comment What are some different cryptography methods?
Elliptic curves and chaos theory are among the answers IMHO.
Feb
2
comment Any efficient text-based steganographic schemes?
IMHO it would be better to avoid frequent modifications of the same piece of text in order not to cause suspicions of the warden, i.e. one simply employs instead other viable channels that transmit new pieces of texts.
Feb
2
awarded  Editor
Feb
2
revised Any efficient text-based steganographic schemes?
added 205 characters in body
Feb
2
comment Any efficient text-based steganographic schemes?
I guess that a weak point of translation-based stego is: Why should a sender send a (poor quality) translation and not the original so that the recipient could have it translated himself (there being facilities on the Internet) and also have the original to check in case ambiguities arise? That question might lead the warden to wonder under circumstances IMHO. On the other hand poor quality messages presumably could work well, if the sender is known to be fairly poor in language competence, e.g. an immigrant taking yet a language course.
Feb
2
comment Any efficient text-based steganographic schemes?
But the editing must have some sense at the superficial level and that would be difficult, wouldn't it? Wouldn't very frequent editing attract suspicions of the warden?
Feb
1
comment Any efficient text-based steganographic schemes?
Accidental trailing spaces are by definition rare. If a stego scheme capitlizes on exploiting trailing spaces, there would be lots of them to attract the warden's attention. Of course almost everything in the real world is connected with probabilities. There is barely 100% surety. One knows that even courts sometimes (have to) base their verdicts on the so-called presumptive evidences and thus occassionally innocent people go to jail because of that.
Feb
1
comment How to best obtain bit sequences from throwing normal dice?
I have computed the values of efficiencies for different number of rolls in increasing order (in parentheses is value of the method described by Thomas) up to 100 rolls: 1 1.66667 (1.33333), 2 2.33333 (2.22222), 4 2.38272, 7 2.53178 (2.40800), 12 2.57454 (2.54856), 24 2.57598, 36 2.57708, 48 2.57712, 53 2.58454 (2.57951)
Jan
31
awarded  Supporter
Jan
31
comment How to best obtain bit sequences from throwing normal dice?
The method you described for both single and two rolls are very fine for the practice, I believe. One just have to look up in a table to write down the bits. For three rolls, however, there is a drop in efficiency, if my computation is not in error. (For the method described by Thomas the efficiency of using 3 rolls is also less than that of using 2 rolls.)
Jan
31
comment What is a tweakable block cipher?
A major reference is: cs.berkeley.edu/~daw/papers/tweak-crypto02.pdf
Jan
30
comment How to best obtain bit sequences from throwing normal dice?
Perhaps I should add that an example of a "practical" question would be: If a random number in [0, 2^1024-1] is required, how should one best go about to generate it as a bit sequence through throwing normal dice?