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seen Oct 21 at 8:45

Aug
22
comment Is it theoretically possible to construct a string that contain its own hash value?
@Gilles that's an interesting approach to it. Ilmari Karonen's answer, which is excellent, still shows how overwhelmingly likely it is for there to exist the case.
Aug
22
comment Is it theoretically possible to construct a string that contain its own hash value?
@poncho I used "infinite" because, indeed, it isn't infinite. However, an string that is 2^128 bits long is so long that for practical purposes I commented it as infinite.
Aug
19
comment Am I insecurely implementing AES in Python?
Strictly speaking, encryption without authentication isn't inherently a mistake, but rather prompt to mistakes on the context of protocols, when misused. For example, data that is to remain in a single place and not be modified or shared should be ok to be encrypted with CBC with no authentication provided. As soon as the encrypted data is used in a protocol (could be read as "shared"), then authentication becomes vital, particularly to avoid things like oracle padding attacks.
Mar
12
comment Would a “Triple AES” (in the sense of how Triple Des works) serve for a dramatic increase in safety?
What poncho indicated is pretty much the argument in favor of using the first option (still upvoted both, your answer and his comment). 256 bits should be enough until we have some powerful quantum computing. The idea is that if either algorithm is ever broken (as poncho described "a cryptographical breakthrough"), the other still provides the protection. So "the level of security is at least as good as one of the two ciphers used". Protecting the keys is usually more important. Keys are (pseudo)randomly generated and are independent, so I trust them as much as I can.