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Oct
16
comment Are LFSRs enough for this?
hmm, I just realized b and t are not the same... I'll have to think about t < b.
Oct
16
comment Are LFSRs enough for this?
An edit is fine with me, though I don't think you should make any more. Too many edits and it's a conversation, which the platform doesn't do well.
Oct
16
revised Are LFSRs enough for this?
considered new premise
Oct
15
revised Are LFSRs enough for this?
added 153 characters in body
Oct
15
answered Are LFSRs enough for this?
Oct
15
comment Are LFSRs enough for this?
If I know the initial state, can't I just step my copy of the LFSR until its state matches one of the tickets? If the time makes sense, assume it was the first player's otherwise keep stepping. Or are we assuming that there are too many steps to make this feasible?
Oct
13
answered Is it possible to 'fake' time for TOTP? (Time-based One-time Password)
Oct
8
comment Are hash functions chaotic?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalanche_effect
Oct
7
comment Session based AES with random key and static salt
Is this in addition to or instead of SSL? Is the RSA key embedded in the application?
Oct
2
comment Is deniable error-correction possible?
Given a set of words $W$ and the noise profile of the channel it's easy to calculate the probability that some received message $w'$ was originally broadcast as a word in $W$. That seems too simple, but I don't see any other way to interpret your question if nothing is secret and there's only 1 message sent.
Oct
2
answered Is deniable error-correction possible?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
19
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
11
comment How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
The method given in Dennis's answer is the only way for an arbitrary group, but note that you get a different mapping depending on which generator you pick. I was thinking that if you knew more about $G$ or how an element of $g$ was represented there might be an integer 0 <= i < p that each element would naturally map to. But it sounds like you're trying to do this without knowing anything about $G$? You might need to rethink that requirement if you want this to be practical.
Sep
10
comment How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
How are you representing elements G? Any group of prime order is isomorphic to $Z_p$ so you can just use that isomorphism.
Aug
13
awarded  Commentator
Aug
13
comment Is there an encryption that is only reversible with a key?
Isn't reversible encryption just encryption?
Jul
23
comment RSA with modulus n=p²q
if j and k have a common factor i, then n has an integer ith root. This will be easier to factor to recover p and q.
Jun
26
comment Do sites store login password with hash? If so, can people can use hash collision to log in?
It can happen but don't underestimate the effort of step 3. Also it's better than the alternatives. Storing plaintext means that B is done at step 2. Storing encrypted passwords means B just needs the key, which is stored in process memory.
Jun
9
comment How can one detect if a hash function doesn't have a full image?
The only information you get is based on collisions, so it takes ~2^n/2 calls before you get any information. For n large enough, that means you can't tell. Otherwise, it's an exercise in estimating size based on collision rate and figuring out when you have achieved statistical significance.