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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 22 votes cast
May
26
awarded  Enthusiast
Apr
16
awarded  Informed
Apr
15
revised Asymmetric encryption that is secure for (almost) any foreseeable future
Clarified that the answer is on asymmetric cryptography.
Apr
15
revised Asymmetric encryption that is secure for (almost) any foreseeable future
Corrected spelling
Apr
15
answered Asymmetric encryption that is secure for (almost) any foreseeable future
Apr
15
answered Is there a way to use bcrypt with passwords longer than 72 bytes securely?
Sep
22
awarded  Organizer
Sep
22
comment Random vs. Fixed Paddings
@CodesInChaos I don't talk about randomness. If I pad a message with defined bytes then the attacker can try to decrypt the message and know that the decrypted text is right because of the padding...
Sep
22
answered Random vs. Fixed Paddings
Sep
18
awarded  Custodian
Sep
18
reviewed Excellent Elliptic Curve Cryptography
Sep
8
comment Is there an intuitive explanation as to why only the private key can decrypt a message encrypted with the public key?
@rubo77 n is an arbitary chosen value. The concrete constraints for this value depends on the algorithm used.
Nov
10
awarded  Yearling
Aug
6
answered Why should I make my cipher public?
Jul
30
comment Assuming a 1024qb quantum computer, how long to brute force 1024bit RSA, 256bit AES and 512bit SHA512
For 5: No, it will not take twice the time as a quantum computer must handle all at once and will not be able to be of any use in your case.
Jul
29
revised Is there an intuitive explanation as to why only the private key can decrypt a message encrypted with the public key?
Corrected spelling
Jul
29
comment Is there an intuitive explanation as to why only the private key can decrypt a message encrypted with the public key?
@king_julien That's it. The difficulty to brute force the parts is the basic security of such algorithms. Also there is no inverse for $m^a \mod p$ which makes it difficult to brute force the algorithms.
Jul
29
revised Is there an intuitive explanation as to why only the private key can decrypt a message encrypted with the public key?
Changed formulas to adhere the typical notation
Jul
29
answered Is there an intuitive explanation as to why only the private key can decrypt a message encrypted with the public key?
Jul
26
reviewed No Action Needed split up sha256 hash and compare indiv block results