281 reputation
26
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location London
age 23
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Mar 27 at 16:54

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Mar
13
comment Assuming that we had a way of finding primes, could RSA be used without computers?
While the question is about RSA, there are lots of interesting methods for modern hand encryption. Solitaire being one.
Mar
12
comment Key expiration policy for 3DES / TDES / Triple DES
@JohnPrice Sorry my mistake, NIST say 2 key is 80, they seem to think 3 key is 112 bits. Anyway, this is a side discussion to your implementation question, you need to use it so fair enough.
Mar
12
comment Key expiration policy for 3DES / TDES / Triple DES
I hope you mean "I have a legacy system with Triple DES" rather than "I am building a system with Triple DES", unless you are being compelled. Incidentally, I believe it has 80 bits of security, from known/chosen plaintext attacks.
Dec
13
awarded  Yearling
Dec
9
revised Assuming that we had a way of finding primes, could RSA be used without computers?
added 37 characters in body
Dec
9
revised Assuming that we had a way of finding primes, could RSA be used without computers?
added 90 characters in body
Dec
9
answered Assuming that we had a way of finding primes, could RSA be used without computers?
Nov
14
comment Is there a proof for showing any cryptogram is crackable?
@user8911: I'm sure you could create a more sophisticated system, like a block cipher, based on the OTP. Or just simply pad by appending more bits your messages to some length, that way only disclosing limited information about length.
Nov
13
comment Is there a proof for showing any cryptogram is crackable?
The only thing you get from a one time padded cypher text is length. This is not just a practical statement, like saying RSA 256 is uncrackable, but a rigorously provable one (I've posted this).
Nov
13
answered Is there a proof for showing any cryptogram is crackable?
Oct
12
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
7
awarded  Quorum
Dec
21
answered AES-GCM and its IV/nonce value
Dec
20
comment Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?
Great points, I agree.
Dec
20
comment AES key length greater than 256 bits - is it dangerous to do an implementation outside of the standard?
256 key length not long enough!? I hope it is, I just advised people to move to it in case of quantum computing. As it stands it would take 50 Titans 3×10^51 years to exhaust the key space. Also there is practically never any guarantee anything you do yourself won't create a side channel attack or worse.
Dec
20
awarded  Supporter
Dec
19
revised How will Cryptography be changed by Quantum Computing?
added 3 characters in body
Dec
19
comment Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?
Answers one question, links should be of use as well. Also, do you think crypto is like amateur asbestos removal, in that the skills we acquire are often ones we should never use?
Dec
19
revised Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?
added 575 characters in body
Dec
19
answered Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?