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Dec
11
comment Is xgcd faster than Fermat for calculating $d$ in RSA?
Typically, when creating an RSA private/public key pair, almost all the time is taken searching for primes; the tiny amount of time taken computing $d$ (or $dp$ and $dq$) is negligible; either method you cite would work.
Dec
10
reviewed Reviewed Probability of factoring keys as a function of bit length
Dec
10
revised Probability of factoring keys as a function of bit length
added 42 characters in body
Dec
10
reviewed Close what is the benefit of lcm in cryptography?
Dec
10
reviewed Close Fermats Little Theorem, primitive root
Dec
10
answered Difference between Symmetric and Asymmetric. Is this answer correct, based on a written test?
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed processing time for multiplication and exponentiation in pairing base cryptography
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed Statistical properties of hash functions when calculating modulo
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed Cocks IBE Scheme: why is -a a quadratic residue mod n?
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed Statistical properties of hash functions when calculating modulo
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed Voting system validation
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed CBC-R when IV unknown
Dec
10
reviewed No Action Needed Polynomial Modulus
Dec
9
comment Is a strong block cipher usable as a strong sponge function?
@Joshua: well, I haven't gone through the sponge proofs in detail; however as generally stated, they want a permutation, and encrypting a constant based with the current state as the key wouldn't be invertible. In addition, the same objection would remain: standard block ciphers assume that the key is unknown; allowing the key to be known (and partially influencable by the adversary) doesn't fall under this model.
Dec
9
comment what is the benefit of lcm in cryptography?
Note that it has fewer advantages than you'd hope: if you use the CRT optimization (which most people do), then both $e^{-1} \pmod {(p-1)(q-1)}$ and $e^{-1} \pmod {\mathrm{lcm}(p-1,q-1)}$ lead to the same value of $dp$ and $dq$, and so they operate exactly the same.
Dec
9
answered Does it necessary the public key is prime number in RSA algorithm?
Dec
8
answered Is a strong block cipher usable as a strong sponge function?
Dec
8
reviewed No Action Needed Active Sbox count in PRESENT Cipher
Dec
8
reviewed No Action Needed Polynomial Inversion over Galois Field
Dec
8
reviewed Leave Open Active Sbox count in PRESENT Cipher