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Nov
5
reviewed No Action Needed Is a die implemented in a physics engine truly random?
Nov
4
reviewed Approve Is python a secure programming language for cryptography?
Nov
4
revised Is SEAL 3.0 broken?
added 400 characters in body
Nov
4
answered Is SEAL 3.0 broken?
Nov
3
comment Is $(f(X), G(X))$ pseudorandom?
Hint: can you think of a pair $f$, $G$ where it is distinguishable?
Nov
3
reviewed Approve Is python a secure programming language for cryptography?
Nov
3
reviewed No Action Needed Brute Force AES Calculations
Nov
3
reviewed Reviewed Is splitting AES ecrypted data safe?
Nov
3
comment Is splitting AES ecrypted data safe?
Actually, you don't need three separate $B_1, B_2, B_3$ values; you can get by with two.
Nov
3
answered Is XCBC where k2 and k3 might be the identical, secure?
Nov
3
reviewed No Action Needed Can DH_anon really be exploited by an attacker?
Nov
3
reviewed No Action Needed Is splitting AES ecrypted data safe?
Nov
3
comment Is splitting AES ecrypted data safe?
Also, you said with "Shamir's method", there's no known weaknesses. Actually, we can make a stronger statement: if the internal values are randomly generated, then we can prove that $N-1$ shares do not give any information about the shared secret (and the same holds for my simpler method).
Nov
3
comment Is splitting AES ecrypted data safe?
Actually, if you want to require all three shares to be able to retrieve the shared secret, then Shamir's method is overkill; just pick two random bit strings $B_1$ and $B_2$ and make those two of the shares; and make the third $B_1 \oplus B_2 \oplus M$, where $M$ is the secret.
Nov
3
answered AES mix column stage
Nov
3
comment File format of an $2048$ bits RSA public key
@Idonknow: no, the two integers are 'the modulus' and the 'public exponent', just as I said
Nov
3
answered File format of an $2048$ bits RSA public key
Nov
3
reviewed No Action Needed How do I safely anonymize/hash a unique identifier to protect privacy?
Nov
3
reviewed Close Is a RSA 2048 bits public key secure
Nov
2
comment AES: Changing plaintext to state
@hamedb71: just about all modern encryption systems handle strings of bytes (or, more generally, a string of bits); whoever uses it is expected to translate his message (in whatever format it is in) into a string of bytes. This translation from 'A'-'Z' -> 0-25 is one possible translation, however it is not the most common. The most common would be to take the ASCII (or Unicode) values, and reinterpret those as a string of bytes.