238 reputation
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bio website joezeng.com
location
age 20
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Aug 21 at 16:51

Jan
22
comment Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
So basically the "security assumption" is based around the number of operations required, in which case, supposing I used AES-256 with 128 bits on each side, it would be. It's not that I actually need it to be a security assumption; I was really just initially wondering whether there was a better way than brute force to find plain/cipher pairs.
Jan
22
comment Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
Could I use it as a security assumption if I upped the bit specification to 64?
Jan
22
comment Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
"Perhaps you were hoping there was some clever way to take advantage of the partly known plaintext/ciphertext; it doesn't work out." Actually, I was hoping there wasn't such a way and that somebody would verify the fact. :P
Jan
22
revised Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
added 104 characters in body
Jan
22
comment Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
That's what I was looking for; thanks. I was wondering whether there was any method easier than those two you listed. If there aren't, that's perfect.
Jan
22
accepted Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
Jan
22
asked Does it take brute force to find a pair of plaintext and ciphertext that each follow a certain condition, given an AES encryption key?
Jan
21
revised A proof-of-work random number generation system for Pokémon
Replaced the question with a zombie notice.
Jan
19
accepted Is it safe to use RSA as a proof-of-work system?
Jan
19
revised Is it safe to use RSA as a proof-of-work system?
added 7 characters in body
Jan
19
comment Is it safe to use RSA as a proof-of-work system?
"However, I wanted to point out that there are other ways to build proof-of-work schemes other than using RSA. Some of them may be superior to RSA-based schemes." I know; I was just wondering whether that thing worked or not.
Jan
19
comment Is it safe to use RSA as a proof-of-work system?
@D.W. This is a rather hypothetical question. Any public-key algorithm should work.
Jan
19
revised Is it safe to use RSA as a proof-of-work system?
Quotes instead of italics.
Jan
19
comment A proof-of-work random number generation system for Pokémon
A colleague of mine at the University of Waterloo suggested this same system about a year ago. I presented him with the same concern, and he gave me the same response.
Jan
19
asked Is it safe to use RSA as a proof-of-work system?
Jan
19
comment A proof-of-work random number generation system for Pokémon
I think the issue with a fixed limit is that it will be literally impossible for certain players to roll "perfect" characters, and I don't want to make that literally impossible, just as unlikely as the game intended.
Jan
19
comment A proof-of-work random number generation system for Pokémon
I've realized that in its current form, this question is very confusing, unclear, and unsuitable for this website. I'm currently writing a paper to formalize the system, which I will submit in a new question.
Jan
17
comment Are asymptotic lower bounds relevant to cryptography?
The one-time pad has nothing to do with the P=NP problem. In fact, if you encrypt using a one-time pad, the unicity distance is the length of the text itself, and you can never even brute-force the result out, or even know if you have the right result without other information.
Jan
17
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
15
comment Why programming languages don't provide simple encryption methods?
"Frameworks could include both the easy version as well as the sophisticated one." The problem there is that there isn't one single "sophisticated" crypto scheme that a library could include by default. There are, as David Schwartz said, varying needs for varying applications of cryptography.