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Aug
27
awarded  Student
Aug
26
asked Are variable-length crypto hash functions still susceptible to collisions?
Mar
25
revised Can a “pattern” in a series of passwords be detected from their hashes (and maybe a single raw password)?
corrected several mistakes and added some new information and examples
Mar
25
awarded  Editor
Mar
25
revised Can a “pattern” in a series of passwords be detected from their hashes (and maybe a single raw password)?
corrected several mistakes and added some new information
Mar
19
awarded  Supporter
Mar
19
comment What makes a hash function good for password hashing?
Ah, that is much clearer. But I can't think of any brute force attack that isn't parallelizable... botnet to attack a server or if you have the list of hashes, throw more hardware at it and spin up more threads/vms.
Mar
19
comment What makes a hash function good for password hashing?
It's been a while since I studied parallelization, so maybe this is obvious: how is PBKDF-2 easily paralellizable? If the hash algorithm is cryptographically secure, then it seems it would be impossible (barring some weakness) to paralellize serial iterations. Doing so would require foreknowledge of the output of the hash algorithm. You can't parallelize f(a) = b, f(b) = c, f(c) = d because you can't start f(b) until you've run f(a), ditto for c.
Mar
19
awarded  Teacher
Jul
20
answered Can a “pattern” in a series of passwords be detected from their hashes (and maybe a single raw password)?