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Jun
22
asked What is the danger if a non-prime is chosen for RSA?
Jun
22
comment How much would it cost in U.S. dollars to brute force a 256 bit key in a year?
I so love the absolute ambiguity, the concrete confusion, the exact existentialism of "something other than matter" and "something other than space".
Jun
22
awarded  Caucus
Jun
22
awarded  Constituent
Jun
5
awarded  Critic
Apr
28
comment What does ⊕ mean in cryptography?
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I've edited your question a bit for readability, hope you don't mind. Your question reads like it might be for homework, so I suggest you read this as well as the general question guide.
Apr
28
answered What does ⊕ mean in cryptography?
Apr
27
revised How does asymmetric encryption work?
Paragraphs and quote blocks, couldn't find a source for the quotation.
Apr
27
suggested approved edit on How does asymmetric encryption work?
Mar
16
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
comment Can we reverse a hash when we know part of the input?
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/22852175
Mar
14
answered Can we reverse a hash when we know part of the input?
Aug
27
awarded  Student
Aug
26
asked Are variable-length crypto hash functions still susceptible to collisions?
Mar
25
revised Can a “pattern” in a series of passwords be detected from their hashes (and maybe a single raw password)?
corrected several mistakes and added some new information and examples
Mar
25
awarded  Editor
Mar
25
revised Can a “pattern” in a series of passwords be detected from their hashes (and maybe a single raw password)?
corrected several mistakes and added some new information
Mar
19
awarded  Supporter
Mar
19
comment What makes a hash function good for password hashing?
Ah, that is much clearer. But I can't think of any brute force attack that isn't parallelizable... botnet to attack a server or if you have the list of hashes, throw more hardware at it and spin up more threads/vms.
Mar
19
comment What makes a hash function good for password hashing?
It's been a while since I studied parallelization, so maybe this is obvious: how is PBKDF-2 easily paralellizable? If the hash algorithm is cryptographically secure, then it seems it would be impossible (barring some weakness) to paralellize serial iterations. Doing so would require foreknowledge of the output of the hash algorithm. You can't parallelize f(a) = b, f(b) = c, f(c) = d because you can't start f(b) until you've run f(a), ditto for c.