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I'm an engineer with experience in applied cryptography, in particular in Smart Card systems.


Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Polish
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Add missing step
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Polish and simplify
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Shorten
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
I'm more confortable with a finite field after all.
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Polish
Jul
8
answered How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Added definition requested
Jul
8
revised How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Exact quote (based on the preprint)
Jul
8
comment How is this affine function a pair wise independent permutation?
Are you reading the actual paper, or what appears to be the Nov 1997 preprint, which does contain (nearly) the sentence now in the second paragraph of the question?
Jul
8
comment An unpredictable PRG is secure (Theorem Yao'82)
I think a proof sketch using contraposition might go: Assume $G$ is not a secure PRG. There is thus an algorithm that breaks $G$. Define $G_i$ which substitutes true random to bits at position $j\ge i$. The same algorithm breaks $G_n$ (since that's $G$) but not $G_0$ (since that's random). So there must be a $i$ such that it breaks $G_{i+1}$ but not $G_i$. Now you can build a predictor for position $i$.
Jul
7
answered Adi Shamir's secret database of all primes
Jul
7
comment Generate Finite Field power of g
Explaining the $(0010)$ notation could come earlier in the response. Kudos for the rest.
Jul
7
comment Adi Shamir's secret database of all primes
That database is to cryptography venues what the Dahu is to French summer camps. Also see the answers to this. $\;$ The three other 'future work' items in the presentation are in the same vein.
Jul
4
comment Getting 88bytes cipher output from 48bytes input in AES
The paper considers that a block cipher's output is wider than its input, likely because the authors confused with some mode of operation of a block cipher complete with IV and padding; that's both for DES and AES.
Jul
4
comment In symmetric searchable encryption are the algorithms public?
In an academic cryptographic context, any algorithm is assumed public (except in specific domains like code obfuscation); that's the second of Kerckhoffs's principles.
Jul
4
comment Is SipHash cryptographically secure?
Ah, yes, that's an excellent reason.
Jul
4
comment Is SipHash cryptographically secure?
Why say "fast"? It only blurs the (valid) argument IMHO. $\;$ +1 for the remark that SipHash could still be a cryptographically strong MAC.
Jul
3
comment Is SHA256 good enough to shrink a key?
No objection...
Jul
3
comment Determine LFSR phase quickly?
If the primitive $P$ of degree $k$ of the generator is not sparse or otherwise unfit, I trust you that we can massage $S/E\equiv x^N\pmod P$ into $A\equiv B^N\pmod Q$, where $Q$ is any primitive polynomial we see fit, and polynomials $A$ and $B$ somehow follow (I fail to tell exactly how, though). We can then solve $A\equiv x^{N_A}\pmod Q$ and $B\equiv x^{N_B}\pmod Q$, and then have $N\equiv N_A-N_B\pmod{2^k-1}$. So at worse, the cost for arbitrary $P$ is twice the cost for any $Q$ we see fit, plus whatever the cost of changing from $S/E\equiv x^N\pmod P$ to $A\equiv B^N\pmod Q$ is.