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Oct
16
revised Which algorithms are used to factorize large integers?
formatting, questiony title, tags
Oct
16
revised Are more complex algorithms easier to break with timing attacks?
better title, formatting, tags; edited tags
Oct
16
revised Time Capsule cryptography?
- algorithm tag, formatting
Oct
16
revised How can I generate large prime numbers for RSA?
- algorithm tag, + prime-numbers tag, title as question
Oct
16
revised Are there asymmetric cryptographic algorithms that are not based on integer factorization and discrete logarithm?
edited tags
Oct
16
revised Designing a key expander out of ciphers
use algorithm-design tag instead of "primatives" (sic!) and "constructions"
Oct
16
revised How can I store confident data with OpenID?
tags, add clarification of goal
Oct
16
answered How can I store confident data with OpenID?
Oct
15
wiki created random-number-generator description
Oct
15
wiki created random-number-generator excerpt
Oct
15
comment Does AES have any fixed-points?
@Fixee: You are right. I added some clarification using the information from the comments.
Oct
15
revised Does AES have any fixed-points?
add disclaimer from comments
Oct
15
comment An Elliptic curve cryptography implementation which can be terminated
Do I understand right, this means that factoring our composed modulus is quite easier than solving discrete logarithms in the curves over the resulting smaller rings (instead of the other way around), and ByteCoin's proposed method will not work?
Oct
15
comment Does AES have any fixed-points?
@ByteCoin: No, I have no ideas. Just the space of fixed-point-free permutations is large enough that we can choose only from those without introducing some weakness by this alone. I hope we get some answers from people which know more about AES (did some cryptanalysis or read the corresponding papers). My argument here is a generic one which is valid (or not) for any block cipher of this block and key size, nothing AES-specific. (I'll edit my answer later after I've got some sleep.)
Oct
15
comment Does AES have any fixed-points?
Good point. I don't know an answer here (and I'm not sure there is one). Actually I would not be too surprised if AES is made to have fewer fixed points than expected, or none at all.
Oct
15
answered Does AES have any fixed-points?
Oct
15
comment How can I store confident data with OpenID?
Do you mean "securely" = "only the OpenID owner has any chance to decrypt it"?
Oct
15
comment An Elliptic curve cryptography implementation which can be terminated
The ring $\mathbb{Z}/n\mathbb{Z}$ is not a field, if $n$ is composite. This might even having elliptic curve arithmetic complicated, not to speak of security at all.
Oct
15
comment How do I apply differential cryptanalysis to a block cipher?
Are the books these? Cryptography Theory and Practice (Douglas Stinson), Differential Cryptanalysis of the Data Encryption Standard (Eli Biham + Adi Shamir). (If so, simply edit the links into your answer.)
Oct
14
revised What are the practical differences between 256-bit, 192-bit, and 128-bit AES encryption?
add paragraph about quantum computer (from comments by Jack Lloyd and Thomas Pornin)