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Oct
28
revised Is there any probabilistic version of RSA?
add a note on the key randomization
Oct
28
answered Is there any probabilistic version of RSA?
Oct
21
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
12
comment Block Cipher Modes
@DrLecter actually, with CBC you can parallelize the decryption, just not the encryption.
Oct
11
revised How does MD5 process text which is shorter than 512 bits
added 7 characters in body
Oct
10
revised How does a chosen ciphertext attack work, with a simple example?
remove the "there is no such thing", as it comes from before the migration.
Oct
6
comment What does “nonlinear mapping” mean?
Welcome to Cryptography Stack Exchange. After your edit, it seems that we only can say "yes" or "no" (and I would say "yes"). Maybe you could move the answering part (after the sentence "I'm not sure if I understand this correct") into an actual answer?
Oct
6
comment Is there a string that's hash is equal to itself?
A rotation itself doesn't prevent things mapping to itself, e.g. (on a byte-level) rotating 11111111 by any amount still gives 11111111.
Oct
6
comment Skein or Keccak stream cipher construction
The stream cipher part is essentially counter mode with a hash function.
Oct
1
awarded  Refiner
Sep
30
comment Homomorphic encryption based on XOR
yes, typo (now fixed). Yes, but the "field of order $2^q$" doesn't have the same addition (or multiplication) as the ring $\mathbb Z/_{2^q \mathbb Z}$, so you shouldn't talk about "$\bmod 2^q$" here. (It is now clearer after your edit.)
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
comment Homomorphic encryption based on XOR
(Actually, $x + y \bmod 2^q$ is not the same operation as $x \oplus y$ for $q > 1$.
Sep
30
comment Homomorphic encryption based on XOR
But for $p = 2^q$, we have $(a \oplus d) \oplus (b \oplus d) = (a \oplus b) \neq (a \oplus b) \oplus d$ – or do you want to define $x \boxplus y := x \oplus y \oplus d$?
Sep
28
comment Why does key generation take an input $1^k$, and how do I represent it in practice?
Why can't we select the $n^{\text {th}}$ circuit with the usual binary form of $n$?
Sep
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
13
comment Last Round in DES
You can incorporate the last swap into the final permutation.
Sep
12
revised Chi-Squared Step of Vigenere Cipher Decryption
formatting