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Apr
4
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
10
comment What is the intuition for ECDSA?
This is very helpful, but without the underlying material (ie, Schnorr signatures and identification scheme discussion) it still requires some work. But perhaps the most useful thing about your answer is that you show that ECDSA is the result of an evolution (from FS, FFS, Schnorr, DSA, then ECDSA) and that helps me know what legwork I need to undertake. Thanks Yehuda!
Mar
10
accepted What is the intuition for ECDSA?
Mar
10
comment What is the intuition for ECDSA?
@HenrickHellström The wikipedia article doesn't give any answers to the questions I gave above: why are forgeries hard? Where did the formulas come from? Why won't a simpler scheme work? What idea(s) did the inventor(s) use to come up with this? Wikipedia just gives what most sources give: a rote recapitulation of the formulas with no explanation.
Mar
10
asked What is the intuition for ECDSA?
Mar
7
comment Why is OTP not vulnerable to brute-force attacks?
@DavidRicherby If $D$ is the probability distribution on plaintexts before the ciphertext $C$ is known, then we'd say Pr$[D] =$ Pr$[D | C]$. In other words, the distribution on plaintexts is unchanged by revelation of the ciphertext.
Mar
5
comment Why is OTP not vulnerable to brute-force attacks?
For a brute force attack to be useful, it has to reveal information you didn't already have before it was conducted. For OTP, brute forcing the keystream yields nothing.
Mar
5
comment Why is OTP not vulnerable to brute-force attacks?
@DavidRicherby It's not nonsense. It's math. The point is that both "bomb Baghdad" and "bomb Chicago" will appear as candidate plaintexts for a 12-character OTP ciphertext, but you have no additional information as to which it is. Or as a cryptographer would put it, "the information you have about the plaintext after seeing the ciphertext is the same as what you had before seeing the ciphertext." You say, "bomb Baghdad" is more likely, but you didn't learn that from the ciphertext; you're relying on information you already had.
Mar
3
answered Why is OTP not vulnerable to brute-force attacks?
Feb
28
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
25
comment DES_cblock and Key Recovery
See Thomas Pornin's answer to this question: security.stackexchange.com/questions/29106/… Does that help?
Feb
6
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
16
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
24
awarded  Yearling
Jun
12
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
29
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
9
accepted What is the sign bit for in Feige-Fiat-Shamir?
Oct
1
revised finding collision for truncated SHA1 hash output
indentation