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bio website ckwop.me.uk
location Widnes, United Kingdom
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
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Feb
12
accepted RFC 3526 - What does pi mean?
Feb
12
comment RFC 3526 - What does pi mean?
I assumed it had some special meaning in this context but you're telling me it's just a "nothing up my sleeve number?" Man, I feel dumb now.
Feb
12
asked RFC 3526 - What does pi mean?
Jan
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
27
comment How long will my encryption remain private?
I think you've overreached @fgrieu. MD5 and A5/1 must surely qualify under you criterion? I'd even put RC4 in that bucket.
Jan
26
revised How long will my encryption remain private?
added 3 characters in body
Jan
26
answered How long will my encryption remain private?
Jan
21
answered Stream cipher with Diffie-Hellman and Cryptographic Hash Function?
Jan
16
answered Json AES128: Security against known plaintext attack
Jan
10
answered Are the SHA family hash outputs practically random?
Jan
4
comment What is the most secure hand cipher?
That isn't a small bias! That's a rather large bias and it would be trivial to win the semantic security game with high probability after only a few hundred queries. It's completely insecure!
Dec
24
comment Where is the proof of security of Diffie's cipher?
I actually bought the book this was referenced in Applied Cryptography. It didn't contain the proof. It's a bit of a mystery. The thing is, if the claim in AC is true, that would actually be a usable perfectly secure cipher. Many people would take a cipher-text expansion of x128 if it delivered perfect security. The fact that nobody mentions it anywhere seems to indicate that either I'm mistaken in how I think it works, or that it never existed in the first place and Schneier simply made a mistake.
Dec
23
answered Is there any strong enough pen-and-paper or mind cipher?
Dec
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
18
answered Is a Mersenne-twister cryptographically secure if I truncate the output?
Dec
16
comment Is there a general method to crack this type of fractionating cipher?
I think it would still work. You'd have two spikes superimposed on top of each other. The digraph frequency for 21 would be higher than 121. Leading to an incorrect assignment on the first pass. However, you'd quickly notice another spike at 121 and immediately see you have an overlap. Since 121 would occur roughly 8% of the time, you'd still be able to distinguish this as being the "true" e. You would then know to treat any "21" without a "1" preceding it as a different letter. You can continue with your cryptanalysis accordingly.
Dec
16
comment Is there a general method to crack this type of fractionating cipher?
@mikeazo - The second one. You run it for unigraphs, digraphs, trigraphs, quadgraphs and so and so. Suppose "e" encoded to 121. The trigraph frequency would be much higher than any other character that encoded to three letters. Over all, it would appear more times than any other group of digits. This would lead you to substitute 121 -> e. You then select the next most frequently occurring sequence and assign that to "t." etc etc until you break the whole message.
Dec
16
answered Is there a general method to crack this type of fractionating cipher?
Dec
9
revised Why is it that researchers prefer finding secure software solutions over secure hardware solutions?
added 1 characters in body
Dec
7
answered Why is it that researchers prefer finding secure software solutions over secure hardware solutions?