143 reputation
4
bio website earlz.net
location Cleveland, OH
age 23
visits member for 1 year
seen 21 hours ago

Hello there! My name's Jordan Earls and I'm a programmer. Recently, I've been doing almost exclusively work in .Net with C#, a bit of raw IL, and in some cases a hefty serving of code generating T4(it's the meta-future!). Sometimes I do a bit of embedded/electronic work with C and C++(http://mbed.org rocks, btw). And finally, I have at least some competence in Ruby, Delphi, and Javascript.

I currently work for PreEmptive Solutions on the Dotfuscator team and troll the dotfuscator tag on occasion.

Most of my personal projects are open source and BSD licensed. The majority of them are at bitbucket with the rest of them being listed on github

Also, you can follow me on the twitters @earlzdotnet


1d
asked Is there a reason that the N value in scrypt is limited to powers of two?
Mar
21
awarded  Scholar
Mar
21
accepted Ensuring that an operation takes a relatively specific amount of time, but easily verify the result
Mar
21
comment Ensuring that an operation takes a relatively specific amount of time, but easily verify the result
@RickyDemer wow this looks like exactly the kind of reading material I was looking for. I just wish I knew more to understand it all easier :)
Mar
21
comment Ensuring that an operation takes a relatively specific amount of time, but easily verify the result
@RickyDemer very interesting and seems to solve my problem. However, I had rather not be reliant on prime numbers due to the possibilities of quantum computers becoming practical
Mar
21
asked Ensuring that an operation takes a relatively specific amount of time, but easily verify the result
Sep
5
comment Will rehashing an SHA256 hash continually, eventually produce every possible value?
See also for this bit on truncating hashes: security.stackexchange.com/questions/34796/…
Sep
4
comment Will rehashing an SHA256 hash continually, eventually produce every possible value?
Hmm.. interesting logic. If only the resources existed to practically test if it was true
Sep
4
asked Will rehashing an SHA256 hash continually, eventually produce every possible value?
May
3
awarded  Student
Apr
27
comment Requiring a “supervisor” key pair and a “user” key pair to decrypt multiple-recipient messages
After pondering on this solution a while longer, I came to a bit of a stand-still. Mainly, I never want for any one person to have the complete key for unlocking the public message. Say Jim supervises over Alice and Matt. In this proposed method, the same key would potentially be encrypted with different private-keys, giving attackers a possible way in (since they know the text contained). Maybe double symetric encryption? I'm not sure
Apr
24
awarded  Supporter
Apr
23
comment Requiring a “supervisor” key pair and a “user” key pair to decrypt multiple-recipient messages
Actually that might not matter. I'm still interested in the answer, but in this scenario it might be better for if Jim died, then all the recipients could come together and unlock it or something
Apr
23
comment Requiring a “supervisor” key pair and a “user” key pair to decrypt multiple-recipient messages
How would this work with N number of destination parties?
Apr
21
asked Requiring a “supervisor” key pair and a “user” key pair to decrypt multiple-recipient messages
Apr
21
awarded  Autobiographer