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bio website samuelkerr.com
location United States
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 14 hours ago

Jul
18
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
15
comment Is it possible to derive the encryption method from encrypted text?
Alternatively, if you determine with LESS than 1/2, you can also consider it broken. Simply pick the opposite of whatever your algorithm says.
Jul
15
accepted How can I use asymmetric encryption, such as RSA, to encrypt an arbitrary length of plaintext?
Jul
14
answered advances in usability for cryptography/authentication
Jul
14
answered Taking advantage of one-time pad key reuse?
Jul
13
awarded  Editor
Jul
13
comment How can I generate large prime numbers for RSA?
+1 for mentioning FIPS, which is different than what most implementations use.
Jul
13
awarded  Scholar
Jul
13
accepted What are the practical differences between 256-bit, 192-bit, and 128-bit AES encryption?
Jul
13
comment What are the practical differences between 256-bit, 192-bit, and 128-bit AES encryption?
There are actual several attacks against AES, reducing time below 2^length. The attacks can be done in 2^119, 2^176, and 2^200 respectively. schneier.com/blog/archives/2009/07/another_new_aes.html
Jul
13
accepted How were the DES S-box values determined?
Jul
13
awarded  Cleanup
Jul
13
awarded  Critic
Jul
13
revised How can I use asymmetric encryption, such as RSA, to encrypt an arbitrary length of plaintext?
rolled back to a previous revision
Jul
12
awarded  Self-Learner
Jul
12
awarded  Precognitive
Jul
12
comment How can a random salt for a hash function work in practice?
You could also think of this as a first preimage attack. This attack is that given a hash h, find a message m where H(m) = h. If the salt was known, this would simply reduce to H(m | salt) = h. Assuming you have a secure hash algorithm, it should be able to resist this first preimage attack.
Jul
12
comment How can a random salt for a hash function work in practice?
That's not true. Without the salt, the attacker would be required to execute a brute force attack. With the salt, the attacker will still need a brute force attack. The difference is, with salt the attacker cannot pre-compute many easy hashes (of 'dog', 'password', etc.) but rather must re-compute the entire hash key space ('dog_kaskd2e','password_kaskd2e', etc).
Jul
12
awarded  Teacher
Jul
12
answered How can a random salt for a hash function work in practice?