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seen Apr 3 at 7:23

Nov
23
answered Is there a cryptographic method to add noise to a plaintext instead of actually encrypting it?
Nov
6
comment What is so special about elliptic curves?
So elliptic curves are like the sweet spot over a continuum of equations that might be used over a group. That continuum seems like it ranges from "way too expensive for computation" (hyper/super elliptic curves) to "the DLP is not difficult enough" (putting P and Q over a conic section or circle). Although your conic section made me wonder why a sphere in $R^{3}$ wouldn't work, too expensive perhaps. +1 and accepted.
Nov
6
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
5
awarded  Supporter
Nov
5
accepted What is so special about elliptic curves?
Nov
5
answered Is it true, that non-military cryptography appeared in 50's and 60's only thanks to leaks from the NSA?
Nov
5
comment What is so special about elliptic curves?
OK so it makes more sense now, after seeing the before and after transformation of it going over the finite field (like caterpillar to butterfly). I added an EDIT as to what I'm still not really getting about why the ec's are so special in that way. It just seems like applying modulus (placing within a group) most equations with 2 higher degree variables would have a comparable effect to create something random enough for cryptographic purposes.
Nov
5
revised What is so special about elliptic curves?
added 534 characters in body
Nov
5
comment What is so special about elliptic curves?
1. Wouldn't any curve be able to form a group if some modulus is applied? Many ec's don't even have the bubble unless $a \lt 0$ and $b \lt 1$ so it seems like any other wavy line in that case.
Nov
5
revised What is so special about elliptic curves?
added 11 characters in body
Nov
5
revised What is so special about elliptic curves?
added 120 characters in body
Nov
5
asked What is so special about elliptic curves?
Nov
3
awarded  Teacher
Nov
3
answered Why $n=pq$ with $p=2p'+1$ and $q=2q'+1$ instead of just $n=p'q'$ for RSA crypto?
Oct
17
comment Cryptanalysis not based on method used to encrypt?
I was trying to find the right term. It's the use of matrices and linear algebra in cryptography. Very large matrices are applied like this en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_cipher or like this aix1.uottawa.ca/~jkhoury/cryptography.htm but as I said I'm not sure how to categorize it.
Oct
16
asked Cryptanalysis not based on method used to encrypt?
Oct
16
awarded  Scholar
Oct
16
accepted Solid summary of what encryption remains strong after recent events
Oct
15
awarded  Student
Oct
14
comment Solid summary of what encryption remains strong after recent events
@Reid I read something about SSL being exploited by them is that totally not accurate? Also, I read that elliptic curve and matrix-based crypto were considered very secure, and RSA and most of the other schemes remained. Was most of their hacking like at the application-level (like backdoors) or were they actually able to attack some of the cryptosystems?